Photo: Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Elizabeth Warren is a Massachusetts senator known for her consumer advocacy and efforts to regulate big financial institutions. Her brainchild, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, was created in 2011.

Key facts:
  • Current position: Senator from Massachusetts — 6 years served
  • Age: 69
  • Born: Oklahoma City
  • Undergraduate: University of Houston
  • Date candidacy announced: Feb. 9, 2019
  • % of votes in line with Trump, per FiveThirtyEight: 13.2%
  • Previous roles: Law professor; member of Congressional Oversight Panel monitoring $700 billion TARP bank bailout program; special adviser for CFPB.
Her stance on key issues:

Key criticism:

1 fun thing:
  • She was a state debate champion in Oklahoma and graduated high school at 16.

Go deeper: What you need to know about the other 2020 candidates

Go deeper

Postal workers' union endorses Biden

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The National Association of Letter Carriers, the union representing roughly 300,000 current and former postal workers, on Friday endorsed Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election, calling him "a fierce ally and defender of the U.S. Postal Service," reports NBC News.

Why it matters: The endorsement comes as President Trump has vowed to block additional funding for the USPS in the next coronavirus stimulus package, linking it to his continued baseless claims that increased mail-in voting will lead to widespread voter fraud.

Lawmakers demand answers from World Bank on Xinjiang loan

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

U.S. lawmakers are demanding answers from the World Bank about its continued operation of a $50 million loan program in Xinjiang, following Axios reporting on the loans.

Why it matters: The Chinese government is currently waging a campaign of cultural and demographic genocide against ethnic minorities in Xinjiang, in northwest China. The lawmakers contend that the recipients of the loans may be complicit in that repression.

Obama: Americans could be "collateral damage" in Trump's war on mail-in voting

Photo: Zahim Mohd/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Former President Barack Obama tweeted Friday that everyday Americans could become "collateral damage" if President Trump continues to attempt to slash funding for the U.S. Postal Service as part of his campaign against mail-in voting.

Why it matters: Trump linked his baseless claims that increased mail-in voting will lead to widespread voter fraud on Thursday to the current impasse in coronavirus stimulus negotiations.