2020 contender Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) told a forum of Native American voters in Iowa Monday that she's "sorry" for harm she's caused the community.

Between the lines: According the Des Moines Register's Ledyard King and Shelby Fleig, 2020 Democrats are heavily courting Native American voters in swing states like Michigan, Wisconsin, Arizona and North Carolina.

"Now, before I go any further in this, I want to say this: Like anyone who's been honest with themselves, I know that I have made mistakes. I am sorry for harm I have caused. I have listened and I have learned, a lot. And I am grateful for the many conversations that we've had together. It is a great honor to be able to partner with Indian Country, and that’s what I’ve tried to do as a senator and that’s what I promise I will do as president of the United States of America."
— Warren

The big picture: Warren has drawn backlash in recent years for overselling her Native American ancestry. As a senator, Warren claimed that Cherokee ancestry was a recurring point in her family's stories and that she was "proud" of the relation, but many questioned the claim.

  • A DNA test later showed Warren to be between 1/32 and 1/1,024 Native American, with "strong evidence" indicating she had a Native American ancestor 6–10 generations ago.

The heritage claim had become a point of jeering for President Trump, who nicknamed her "Pocahontas" and claimed she had used a false minority status to get her former teaching role at Harvard Law School.

  • In a 1996 letter responding to criticism of a lack of minority women at the university, Harvard did dub Warren as Native American.
  • Warren also claimed minority status in 1986 when registering for the Texas State Bar Association.
  • There is no indication that the claim ever had an influence on Warren’s employment, per a Boston Globe investigation last year.

Of note: According to reporting from The Intercept's Ryan Grim, Warren had already apologized privately to Cherokee leadership.

Go deeper: Elizabeth Warren on the issues, in under 500 words

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Trump tightens screws on ByteDance to sell Tiktok

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump added more pressure Friday night on China-based TikTok parent ByteDance to exit the U.S., ordering it to divest all assets related to the U.S. operation of TikTok within 90 days.

Between the lines: The order means ByteDance must be wholly disentangled from TikTok in the U.S. by November. Trump had previously ordered TikTok banned if ByteDance hadn't struck a deal within 45 days. The new order likely means ByteDance has just another 45 days after that to fully close the deal, one White House source told Axios.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 21,056,850 — Total deaths: 762,293— Total recoveries: 13,100,902Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m ET: 5,306,215 — Total deaths: 168,334 — Total recoveries: 1,796,309 — Total tests: 65,676,624Map.
  3. Health: CDC: Survivors of COVID-19 have up to three months of immunity Fauci believes normalcy will return by "the end of 2021" with vaccine — The pandemic's toll on mental health — FDA releases first-ever list of medical supplies in shortage.
  4. States: California passes 600,000 confirmed coronavirus cases.
  5. Cities: Coronavirus pandemic dims NYC's annual 9/11 Tribute in Light.
  6. Business: How small businesses got stiffed — Unemployment starts moving in the right direction.
  7. Politics: Biden signals fall strategy with new ads.

Harris: "Women are going to be a priority" in Biden administration

Sen. Kamala Harris at an event in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In her first sit-down interview since being named Joe Biden's running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris talked about what she'll do to fight for women if elected VP, and how the Democrats are thinking about voter turnout strategies ahead of November.

What they're saying: "In a Biden-Harris administration women are going to be a priority, understanding that women have many priorities and all of them must be acknowledged," Harris told The 19th*'s Errin Haines-Whack.