Warren, Biden and Sanders debate on Jan. 14 in Des Moines, Iowa. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

2020 Democrats have pitched policies for reproductive health as the most restrictive abortion laws in generations are being challenged in courts across America's red states.

Catch up quick: Most Democratic candidates agree on two things: codifying Roe v. Wade and reversing the Trump administration's Title X gag rule. But, candidates' personal voting histories on reproductive rights remains a sticking point: Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar all previously voted for the Hyde Amendment, Politico reports.

  • Former Vice President Joe Biden: He would support a congressional decision to codify abortion rights if it became necessary and would repeal the Trump administration's gag rule on Title X, a federal grant program to provide comprehensive and confidential family planning and health services.
    • In June, Biden flipped on his previous support for the Hyde Amendment — which bans the use of federal funds for abortion with three exceptions: rape, incest and to save a woman's life.
  • Sen. Elizabeth Warren: She wants to codify Roe v. Wade, pass the Women's Health Protection Act to prevent states from limiting or blocking abortion access, repeal the Hyde Amendment, and end the Trump administration's gag rule on the family planning program known as Title X.
  • Sen. Bernie Sanders: He wants to fully fund Planned Parenthood and Title X, and appoint federal judges who align with Roe v. Wade. Sanders has argued that his Medicare for All proposal would ensure "a woman’s right to control her own body by covering comprehensive reproductive care, including abortion."
  • Former Mayor Pete Buttigieg: If elected, he says he would appoint judges who "understand that freedom includes access to reproductive health and reproductive rights for women..." He has considered codifying Roe v. Wade, per AP. If elected, he would repeal the Hyde Amendment.
  • Former tech executive Andrew Yang: He says his proposed "Universal Basic Income" would help pregnant women who are struggling financially, which he lists as one of the "most effective ways to decrease the number of abortions" in America.
    • Yang believes state requirements on abortion access "should be subject to oversight by a board of doctors." If elected, he would appoint judges who align with Roe v. Wade.
  • Sen. Amy Klobuchar: She said she will appoint judges who support Roe v. Wade at a Planned Parenthood forum in June. Klobuchar wants to codify Roe v. Wade and repeal the Trump administration's gag rule on Title X.
  • Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg: He supports codifying Roe v. Wade, as well as repealing the Hyde Amendment the Trump administration's Title X gag rule. His maternal health plan calls for centralizing the CDC's maternal mortality data and allowing low-income women to enroll in a public insurance option for free.

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Editor's note: This story has been updated to include more policy information. Beto O'Rourke, Julián Castro, Cory Booker and Kamala Harris have been removed after dropping out of the 2020 presidential race.

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