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Photo: Blake Nissen/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Walmart announced it will be returning guns and ammunition to sales floors one day after the company said it would remove all firearm displays from its 4,700 U.S. stores to prevent theft amid social unrest.

What they're saying: A Walmart spokesperson told Axios the retailer reversed the decision because the most recent looting incidents "have remained geographically isolated."

  • "After civil unrest earlier this week resulted in damage to several of our stores, consistent with actions we took over the summer, we asked stores to move firearms and ammunition from the sales floor to a secure location in the back of the store in an abundance of caution."
  • "As the current incidents have remained geographically isolated, we have made the decision to begin returning these products to the sales floor today," a spokesperson said.
  • On Thursday, a Walmart spokesperson told Axios its initial move to pull guns and ammunition displays served "as as a precaution for the safety of our associates and customers.

The big picture: The retailer removed firearms and ammo from some of its stores this summer amid nationwide protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd.

    • Since the start of this year's anti-racism demonstrations, businesses — including Target stores in Minneapolis — have seen damage and looting.

Worth noting: The company remains a major gun retailer despite changes to its policies throughout the years.

Go deeper

Nov 10, 2020 - Science

Cruise to test autonomous grocery delivery for Walmart in Arizona

Photo: Cruise

Walmart is partnering with self-driving technology company Cruise to pilot autonomous grocery deliveries in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Why it matters: Cruise is not the first partner Walmart has selected to test AV deliveries. But the retailer noted that Cruise's fleet of electric vehicles, powered with renewable energy, supports its mission to achieve zero emissions by 2040.

6 hours ago - Health

Food banks feel the strain without holiday volunteers

People wait in line at Food Bank Community Kitchen on Nov. 25 in New York City. Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York City

America's food banks are sounding the alarm during this unprecedented holiday season.

The big picture: Soup kitchens and charities, usually brimming with holiday volunteers, are getting far less help.

8 hours ago - Health

AstraZeneca CEO: "We need to do an additional study" on COVID vaccine

Photo: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot said on Thursday the company is likely to start a new global trial to measure how effective its coronavirus vaccine is, Bloomberg reports.

Why it matters: Following Phase 3 trials, Oxford and AstraZeneca said their vaccine was 90% effective in people who got a half dose followed by a full dose, and 62% effective in people who got two full doses.