A Target store in Minneapolis as the area has become the site of an ongoing protest after the police killing of George Floyd. Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Target CEO Brian Cornell wrote, "we’ve vowed to face pain with purpose," in a statement released on Saturday regarding the Minneapolis protests that followed the police killing of George Floyd. The company closed two dozen stores in the Twin Cities area.

What he is saying: "We are a community in pain. That is not unique to the Twin Cities—it extends across America. The murder of George Floyd has unleashed the pent-up pain of years, as have the killings of Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor. We say their names and hold a too-long list of others in our hearts."

  • Cornell also said Target will make sure employees of the closed locations continue to receive full benefits and pay in the comings weeks.
  • Additionally, Target's "merchant and distribution teams are preparing truckloads of first aid equipment and medicine, bottled water, baby formula, diapers and other essentials, to help ensure that no one within the areas of heaviest damage and demonstration is cut off from needed supplies."

The state of play: One of Target's stores in Minneapolis was damaged amid protests over Floyd's death, per CBS Minnesota.

Go deeper... The aftermath of George Floyd's death: Everything you need to know

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Walmart bans Mississippi state flag due to Confederate symbol

A Walmart store in Mountain View, California. Photo: Yichuan Cao/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Walmart will no longer display the Mississippi state flag in its stores, since it is the only flag in the U.S. to embed the Confederate battle flag, the AP first reported and Axios confirmed.

Driving the news: The NCAA announced on Friday that it would no longer hold championship events in Mississippi, due to the Confederate symbol's "prominent presence" on the state flag.

Second-tier cities vie for telecommuters

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Lingering post-pandemic remote work could redistribute some New York City and Silicon Valley jobs to the American heartland, and smaller cities are already competing to attract talent — but it won't be so easy.

The big picture: Although U.S. workers will have the option to scatter and get out of the crowded and expensive metros, the pull of those places may be too strong for the second-tier cities to win out.

Updated Jul 7, 2020 - Politics & Policy

The major police reforms that have been enacted since George Floyd's death

NYPD officers watch a George Floyd protest in Manhattan on June 6. Photo: Scott Heins/Getty Images

Nationwide Black Lives Matter protests sparked by George Floyd's killing have put new pressure on states and cities to scale back the force that officers can use on civilians.

Why it matters: Police reforms of this scale have not taken place in response to the Black Lives Matter movement since its inception in 2013, after George Zimmerman's acquittal for shooting Trayvon Martin, an unarmed Black teenager.