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Photo Illustration: Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Twitter will begin labeling accounts belonging to state-affiliated media outlets from countries on the U.N. Security Council, it announced Thursday.

The big picture: The new policy will affect “outlets where the state exercises control over editorial content” in China, France, Russia, the U.K., and the U.S., according to the announcement.

  • “For transparency and practicality, we are starting with a limited and clearly-defined group of countries before expanding to a wider range of countries in the future,” Twitter said.
  • The change will also apply for the organizations' "editors-in-chief, and/or their senior staff."
  • Twitter won't label "state-financed media organizations with editorial independence, like the BBC in the UK or NPR in the US," it said.

Why it matters: The move comes as social media companies face rising calls to address foreign influence campaigns and misinformation on their platforms. Facebook began labeling state-backed press accounts in June.

Worth noting: Twitter will also label the accounts of senior government officials from U.N.S.C. countries "who are the official voice of the state abroad," including foreign ministers, ambassadors, and diplomatic leaders.

Go deeper

Nov 13, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Spotting political indicators without the polls

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

With political polls looking close to useless, newsrooms are increasingly turning to internet trends, demographics and local news in an effort to crack America’s baffling political code.

Why it matters: This election proved that polls aren't the only way to measure public opinion trends — and that other measures, like social media, may give us a window into enthusiasm among populations that polls are missing.

Dave Lawler, author of World
Nov 13, 2020 - World

Nearly the whole world considers Biden president-elect

Expand chart
Data: Axios research; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

With China belatedly congratulating Joe Biden and Kamala Harris on their election victory on Friday, the list of countries still declining to acknowledge Biden's victory is getting very short.

State of play: Brazil's Jair Bolsonaro, Mexico's Andrés Manuel López Obrador and Russia's Vladimir Putin are among the very few world leaders who say they're waiting for President Trump's legal challenges to play out. North Korea's Kim Jong-un is in a slightly larger group — those who've declined to comment on the results either way.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

House cancels Thursday session as FBI, Homeland Security warn of threat to Capitol

Photo: Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

The FBI and Department of Homeland Security predict violent domestic extremists attacks will increase in 2021, according to a report obtained by Axios.

Driving the news: The joint report says extremists have discussed plans to take control of the Capitol and "remove Democratic lawmakers" on or about March 4. The House canceled its plans for Thursday votes as word of the possible threats spread.