Trump at a Cabinet session on youth vaping and e-cigarettes on Nov 22. 2019. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

About 10% of President Trump's 2016 voters said they would be less likely to vote for a 2020 presidential candidate that backs a flavored e-cigarette ban, a Morning Consult poll published Wednesday shows.

Why it matters: The Trump administration has been weighing a federal ban on almost all flavored vaping products since September. At least 47 people have died from a lung injury associated with e-cigarette use in 25 states.

Yes, but: 51% of Trump's 2016 voters said they strongly support banning flavored e-cigarettes in a Morning Consult poll conducted right after the administration floated a ban in September. 26% of his 2016 voters said they supported a ban "somewhat."

The state of play: Conservative leaders have shared data with the White House that claims adults who vape will turn on Trump if a flavored product ban goes forward, but their case has included unsubstantiated assumptions about adult vapers and depicted them as single-issue voters.

  • Of note: Several 2016 battleground states with high GOP win margins also had a higher estimated number of adult vapers than states that went blue, per a 2018 study.

Methodology: The Morning Consult's survey used a sample of 677 Trump voters out of 1,988 total voters, with a margin of error of 4%.

The bottom line: Massachusetts became the first state to outlaw flavored tobacco and vaping products on Wednesday, as other temporary state bans work through the courts.

Go deeper: GOP allies warn vaping ban will sink Trump in 2020

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Dozens of Confederate symbols removed in wake of George Floyd's death

A statue of Confederate States President Jefferson Davis lies on the street after protesters pulled it down in Richmond, Virginia, in June. Photo: Parker Michels-Boyce/AFP via Getty Images

59 Confederate symbols have been removed, relocated or renamed since anti-racism protests began over George Floyd's death, a new Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) report finds.

Why it matters: That's a marked increase on previous years, per the report, which points out just 16 Confederate monuments were affected in 2019.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10:30 p.m. ET: 20,532,835 — Total deaths: 747,845— Total recoveries: 12,743,275Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10:30 p.m. ET: 5,193,266 — Total deaths: 165,934 — Total recoveries: 1,714,960 — Total tests: 63,252,257Map.
  3. Politics: Pelosi says Mnuchin told her White House is "not budging" on stimulus position.
  4. Business: U.S. already feeling effects of ending unemployment benefits.
  5. Public health: America's two-sided COVID-19 response America is flying blind on its coronavirus response.
  6. Education: New Jersey governor allows schools to reopenGallup: America's confidence in public school system jumps to highest level since 2004.
Updated 1 hour ago - Health

World coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

France reported more than 2,500 new COVID-19 cases in 24 hours — the largest single-day number since May. French officials said the situation was "clearly worsening," per France 24.

By the numbers: Over 745,600 people have died of the novel coronavirus globally and over 20.4 million have tested positive, per Johns Hopkins. Almost 12.7 million have recovered from the virus.