Cybersecurity

The hidden risks of remote software updates

Illustration of a car with loading symbols instead of wheels
Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

To get a car with the latest automated driving features all it takes in some cases is a couple of software updates — a growing trend with potential safety and cybersecurity risks.

Why it matters: Using a built-in wireless connection to fix a bug or add new functions can be a welcome convenience that can also prompt people to make needed repairs. But if it means instantly handing over more of the driving task to your vehicle, you could be putting yourself at risk if the new software is glitchy or you don't understand and misuse the car's new capabilities.

Shamoon malware attack confirmed by hacked Italian energy firm

The Saipem FDS 2 moored off Cyprus. Photo: Athanasios Gioumpasis/Getty Images

Two days after researchers identified a new variant of Shamoon, an Italian oil drilling company admitted the infamous malware was used in an attack against the company earlier this week.

Why it matters: Shamoon is destructive malware that has only been seen in the wild three times since 2012 (and one of those is in dispute), including some of the most famous cyberattacks in history. Its return has raised eyebrows.

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