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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

China, with a series of short and long-term moves on the global stage, is doing something few others can: eliciting similar warnings and worries from Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan, Republican Sen. Marco Rubio and nationalist Steve Bannon. 

  • All three say China is a growing threat to America’s workers, economy, technology and national security.
  • All three weighed in after Jim VandeHei and I posted our piece Monday calling China the single greatest threat to the United States. 

In an era where political adversaries seem to agree on nothing, their takes were shockingly similar: 

  • Ryan, a Democrat who represents the classic Rust Belt town of Youngstown, Ohio: "I’m getting more and more worried every day ... China has a grand strategy that includes all of government — economy, military, education and politics — with the goal of elevating China to the number one military and economic power in the world."
  • Rubio, Republican of Florida: "The Chinese know our pressure points. ... Americans benefit every day from the fact that America is the most powerful nation on earth. If that's erased, this won't be the same country. If economic and military power move to China, an authoritarian state, that affects things we take for granted like free speech, equal opportunity and human rights."
  • Bannon, President Trump's former chief strategist: "China has survived intact for 4,000 years because they have perfected 'barbarian management.' They view us as a 'tributary state,' a natural resource and agriculture provider — Jamestown to their Great Britain. ... Trump must keep the hammer down."

Both Ryan and Rubio say the issue is getting increasing resonance with constituents, but they remain frustrated with the lack of urgency among their colleagues, and the mixed signals from Trump.

Trump’s blunt view of the Chinese: They’re ripping us off so hit them hard with tariffs.

  • That mindset may not lend itself to the comprehensive, targeted and strategic response that many believe is required.

Be smart: Experts say the U.S. is falling further behind, and that the nation needs a massive strategic and investment plan similar to the post-World War II mobilization that included the Marshall Plan, the G.I. Bill and the space race.

Go deeper ... VandeHei's seminal take on Beijing's plans for 2018, 2025 and 2050, "China is the greatest, growing threat to America."

  • Be smart: While America dawdles and bickers, China is thinking long-term — and acting now, everywhere.

Worthy of your time:

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Go deeper

Read: Pete Buttigieg's opening statement ahead of confirmation hearing

Pete Buttigieg, President Biden's nominee to be secretary of transportation, in December. Photo: Kevin Lamarque/AFP via Getty Images

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Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 8: The siege. An inside account of the deadly insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6 that ultimately failed to block the certification of the Electoral College. And, finally, Trump's concession.

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