Illustration: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

China is in the midst of an artificial intelligence frenzy, spurred in part by the "Next Generation Artificial Intelligence Development Plan" Beijing released in July that promises huge policy and financial support in pursuit of expansive goals between now and 2030.

The big question: Will AI sharpen competition between the US and China? Right now, the most likely outcome is that it will.

A white paper by Kai-Fu Lee, founder of Sinovation Ventures and a world-renowned AI researcher, and Paul Triolo, head of Eurasia Group's Geo-technology practice, argues that China and the US are already in a global AI duopoly because China has several structural advantages for AI development:

  • Huge data sets generated by nearly a billion Internet users and few privacy restrictions.
  • A rapidly growing pool of talented Chinese AI engineers.
  • Some of the best and most aggressive entrepreneurs in the world.
  • A very supportive government policy, including significant financial support.

The big picture: China's AI plan is part of the Chinese government's blueprint for becoming a superpower and achieving "the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation," while maintaining Communist Party control.

  • As Elsa B. Kania, a fellow at the Center for a New American Security, recently wrote: "China plans to pursue cutting-edge advances in a category of critical next-generation AI technologies in order to "occupy the commanding heights" of AI science and technology."
  • Kania also wrote that the Chinese government "plans to leverage its rise in AI to enhance national competitiveness, while bolstering its capacity to ensure state security and national defense." It plans to "leverage AI to create systems for intelligent monitoring and early warning and control of potential (or perceived) threats."

The bottom line: China has the data, the talent, the money, the regulatory environment and the government vision to become an artificial intelligence superpower. As in an increasing number of other areas, US-China AI competition is far more likely than cooperation.

Go deeper: Battlefield Singularity: Artificial Intelligence, Military Revolution, and China's Future Military Power by Elsa B. Kania

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SurveyMonkey poll: Young voters' red-state blue wall

Data: SurveyMonkey; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

There are only five states in the U.S. where voters younger than 35 embrace President Trump over Joe Biden, and none are swing states, according to new 50-state SurveyMonkey-Tableau data for Axios.

Why it matters: These scattered red spots in a sea of blue vividly illustrate Trump's peril if young people were to actually turn out this year. Put another way, Trump's path to re-election depends heavily on younger adults staying home.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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U.S. officials: Iran and Russia aim to interfere in election

Iran and Russia have obtained voter registration information that can be used to undermine confidence in the U.S. election system, Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe announced at a press conference Wednesday evening.

Why it matters: The revelation comes roughly two weeks before Election Day. Ratcliffe said Iran has sent threatening emails to Democratic voters this week in states across the U.S. and spread videos claiming that people can vote more than once.