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Waiting in line to recieve financial assistance from Qatar, in Gaza City. Photo: Al H.m. Jadallah/Anadolu Agency via Getty

Qatar has informed Israel that it will suspend money transfers to Gaza next month because of Israel's pending plans to annex parts of the West Bank, Western diplomats briefed on the matter tell me.

Why it matters: Qatar transfers money to government employees and poor families in Gaza, which is run by Hamas, as part of an Israel-Hamas ceasefire deal. Suspension of the payments could lead to renewed violence.

  • Qatar will not resume the payments until the situation around possible annexation becomes clearer, the sources say.

The backstory: Israel's government has been debating plans to annex up to 30% of the West Bank as soon as July 1, and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is hoping for a green light from the White House to proceed.

Behind the scenes: Qatar has conveyed its message through multiple channels over the past two week, including in a Zoom meeting of donor countries to the Palestinian Authority.

  • The Qatari representative in the meeting stressed that any Israeli annexation step in the West Bank will have consequences.
  • The Western diplomats said his message was directed at senior Israeli officials who were also on the Zoom meeting.

The bottom line: The Qataris are concerned that Israel will implement its annexation plans on July 1 — Netanyahu's deadline — and don’t want to be perceived as enabling Israeli annexation by sending money to keep the peace in Gaza.

Go deeper: Netanyahu privately presents 4 plans for West Bank annexation

Go deeper

Sep 29, 2020 - World

Netanyahu claims Hezbollah storing missiles at Beirut site

Photo: Screengrab via UN

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu presented what he claimed were aerial photos of a Hezbollah "missile depot" in the heart of Beirut during a prerecorded speech Tuesday to the UN General Assembly.

The other side: Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah quickly took to the organization’s TV station to respond to Netanyahu's speech, which he said was an effort to incite the Lebanese people against Hezbollah.

Ubisoft workers demand company accountability in open letter

Photo: Frederic Brown / Getty Images

Close to 500 current and former employees of “Assassin’s Creed” publisher Ubisoft are standing in solidarity with protesting game developers at Activision Blizzard with a letter that criticizes their company's handling of sexual misconduct.

Why it matters: Ubisoft and Activision Blizzard workers are framing the actions as part of a bigger movement meant to have lasting change in the industry and its culture.

Companies deploy tech to prevent retail crime

Customers in a Home Depot in Pleasanton, California, in February 2021. Photo: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Retailers have a new edge for fighting theft: They're using technology to disable stolen goods — from iPhones to Black & Decker drills — and render them useless.

Why it matters: Organized retail crime has a considerable affect on retailers every year, costing them an average of $719,000 per $1 billion dollars in sales, according to estimates from the National Retail Federation.