Carolyn Kaster / AP

An AP-NORC phone poll finds that:

  • 56% of adults are "extremely" or "very" concerned that many people will lose health-care coverage if Obamacare is repealed.
  • 53% want to keep the law in some form. 46% think it should be repealed.
  • About 33% support the individual mandate. Other provisions — including the elimination of out-of-pocket costs for preventive care and allowing children to stay on their parents' plans until 26 — have overwhelming support.

The partisan breakdown: More than 80% of Democrats are "extremely" or "very" worried about Obamacare getting repealed. That's true for just 20% of Republicans.

Poll of doctors: Only 15% of physicians support Obamacare repeal

Go deeper

Official says White House political appointees "commandeered" Bolton book review

John Bolton's book "The Room Where it Happened." Photo: Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

A former career official at the National Security Council claims her pre-publication review of former national security adviser John Bolton's explosive book on President Trump was "commandeered by political appointees for a seemingly political purpose," according to a letter from her lawyers filed in court on Tuesday.

Why it matters: The White House fought against the publication of Bolton's book for most of the year on the grounds that it contained harmful and "significant amounts of classified information."

House Democrats unveil sweeping reforms package to curtail presidential abuses

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Photo by Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

House Democrats on Wednesday unveiled sweeping legislation aimed at preventing presidential abuse and corruption, strengthening transparency and accountability, and protecting elections from foreign interference.

Why it matters: While the bill has practically no chance of becoming law while Trump is in office and Republicans hold the Senate, it's a pre-election message from Democrats on how they plan to govern should Trump lose in November. It also gives Democratic members an anti-corruption platform to run on in the weeks before the election.

TikTok's content-moderation time bomb

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

When the dust finally clears from the fight over TikTok, whoever winds up running the burgeoning short-video-sharing service is likely to face a world of trouble trying to manage speech on it.

Why it matters: Facebook’s story already shows us how much can go wrong when online platforms beloved by passionate young users turn into public squares.

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