Vice President Mike Pence speaks at the Coronavirus Task Force Press Conference. Photo: Barcroft Media / Contributor

A member of the Office of the Vice President has tested positive for the coronavirus, Katie Miller, Pence's press secretary, said Friday evening.

What she's saying: "Neither President Trump nor Vice President Pence had close contact with the individual. Further contact tracing is being conducted in accordance with CDC guidelines," Miller said in a statement.

The big picture: More than a dozen lawmakers have entered voluntary self-quarantine amid the COVID-19 outbreak, and more are expected — testing Speaker Nancy Pelosi's proclamation last week that Congress will be "the last to leave."

Flashback: Trump's coronavirus test came back negative, his physician said Saturday. Pence said he and his wife would be "more than happy to be tested" the same day.

Go deeper: First Congress members test positive for coronavirus

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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Photo: Peter Zay/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

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