Apr 10, 2024 - News

The Virginia bills Youngkin has vetoed

Photo illustration of Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin with lines radiating from him.

Photo Illustration: Brendan Lynch/Axios. Photo: Robb Hill/Washington Post via Getty Images

Gov. Youngkin has vetoed more bills than any governor in modern Virginia history.

The big picture: The last to hold the record, former Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe, had a Republican-controlled legislature for most of his term, and vetoed 120 bills.

  • Youngkin issued 153 this year alone, and a total of 194 since taking office in 2022.

Between the lines: Vetoed bills can still make a comeback in the legislature, but that requires a two-thirds majority vote Democrats don't have.

  • Revival would require bipartisan support.

These are a few Youngkin said "no" to:

Abortion

🩺 A series of bills shielding abortion providers from extradition to other states where abortion is illegal or disciplinary action from state regulators.

Environment

🌏 Legislation that would have expanded climate change education in Virginia's public schools.

Guns

🔫 A ban on assault weapons.

🚗 A push to make it illegal to leave a gun unattended in a car.

⏰ A required five-day waiting period before purchasing a firearm so the seller can obtain a criminal history record.

✍🏼 A government watchdog study on gun violence's effects on communities.

Health

💊 The creation of a Prescription Drug Affordability Board, which advocates say could reduce drug costs for residents by capping how much Virginia pays manufacturers for them.

Weed

🍃 Any hope of having a legal retail weed market.

👨‍⚖️ The chance at modified sentences for people in jail or on probation for some marijuana-related felony offenses.

🔍 A bill preventing the state from allowing a parent's use of marijuana to be the sole evidence for alleged child abuse and neglect.

Workers

💰 Bills to raise the minimum wage to $13.50 next year and $15 per hour by 2026 and another making farm workers eligible for state minimum wage.

😷 The creation of a state-run paid family and medical leave program funded by employer and employee contributions.

What's next: The General Assembly will take up Youngkin's budget amendments and vetoes on April 17.

Go deeper: The bills Youngkin has signed into law.

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