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The body of civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis arrived at the U.S. Capitol Rotunda on Monday to lie in state, following a series of memorials this weekend that included a final trip across Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama.

The big picture: Lewis is the first Black lawmaker to receive the honor. Because the Capitol is closed to the public due to the coronavirus, Lewis will lie in state for just a few hours after an invitation-only ceremony is held for lawmakers. A public viewing will be held on the Capitol steps.

  • Vice President Mike Pence and former Vice President Joe Biden are set to attend, but President Trump, who clashed with Lewis in recent years, said he will not be making an appearance.
  • On his way to the Capitol, the hearse carrying Lewis' remains made stops at the Lincoln Memorial and the newly renamed Black Lives Matter Plaza in front of the White House.

Worth noting: The late Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) was the first Black lawmaker to lie in state in the Capitol, but he was honored in Statuary Hall and not in the Rotunda, per the New York Times.

What they're saying:

  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.): "When John made his speech 57 years ago, he was the youngest speaker at the March on Washington program. How fitting it is that in the final days of his life, he summoned the strength to acknowledge the young people peacefully protesting in the same spirit of that march, taking up the unfinished work of racial justice. Helping complete the journey begun more than 55 years ago."
  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.): "History only bent toward what's right because people like John paid the price to help bend it. ... John Lewis lived and worked with urgency because the task was urgent. But even though the world around him gave him every cause for bitterness, he stubbornly treated everyone with respect and love."

Go deeper: Listen to a recorded speech from Lewis played at his memorial service

In photos
A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.
Lewis' hearse drives through newly renamed Black Lives Matter Plaza. Photo: Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images
D.C. police salute Lewis' hearse as it drives by. Photo: Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images
Security barriers are set up for public viewing later in the day for Lewis at the U.S. Capitol. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images
Two people hold a sign that reads "Rest in Power John Lewis" as Lewis' hearse drives by the Lincoln Memorial. Photo: Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images
A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.
The flag-draped casket is carried by a joint services military honor guard to lie in state. Photo: Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images
McConnell and Pelosi, who are slated to give remarks at the ceremony. Photo: Matt McClain/Pool/AFP via Getty Images
Pelosi gives a speech paying her respects. Photo: Michael A. McCoy/POOL/AFP via Getty Images
A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

Go deeper

Updated Nov 3, 2020 - Politics & Policy

In photos: Trump and Biden make final push for voters on election eve

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks during a drive-in rally in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and President Trump at his campaign event in Traverse City, Michigan, on Nov. 2.

President Trump and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden's contrasting styles and attitudes toward the coronavirus pandemic were starkly evident on their final day of campaigning before the election.

The big picture: Trump held packed rallies as he criss-crossed states, with events in North Carolina, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin on Monday. Biden's campaign focused on Ohio and Pennsylvania, seen as crucial to the election. His campaigning has been notable for precautions against COVID-19, such as holding drive-in rallies.

In photos: America on edge amid fears of election violence

Boarded up windows in D.C. Photo: Liu Jie/Xinhua via Getty Images

America's cities are bracing for violence as soon as tomorrow.

Driving the news: Landmarks, stores, and restaurants in New York, Washington D.C. and other cities are boarding up their doors in fear that Election Day will bring another blow to their businesses, many of which are already reeling from the pandemic and damage from protests.

Updated Nov 10, 2020 - World

In photos: Coronavirus restrictions grow across Europe

A waiter stands on an empty street in downtown Lisbon on Nov. 9, after Portugal introduced a night-time curfew for 70% of the population, including the capital and also the coastal city of Porto. It'll last for at least two weeks, per the BBC. Photo: Patricia De Melo Moreira/AFP via Getty Images

Portugal and Hungary have become the latest European countries to impose partial lockdowns, with curfews going into effect overnight. Governments across the continent are imposing more restrictions in attempts to curb COVID-19 spikes.

The big picture: Over 9.2 million cases have been reported to the European Centre for Disease Control. Per the ECDC, France has the most (almost 1.8 million) followed by Spain (over 1.3 million) and the United Kingdom (nearly 1.2 million). The COVID death rate per 100,000 of the population is highest in the Czech Republic (25), followed by Belgium (19) and Hungary (10.4).