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Photo: Andre Borges/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro announced Tuesday that he tested positive for coronavirus.

Why it matters: Brazil's coronavirus outbreak is one of the largest in the world, topped only by the U.S., and Bolsonaro has long downplayed the effects of the virus, pushing businesses to reopen over the last few months in order to jumpstart the country's economy.

Bolsonaro made the announcement on television, and noted he had long said much of the population would inevitably get the virus, which he has repeatedly dismissed as a "simple flu."

  • Social distancing has steadily become less prevalent in the country, according to the influential IHME model.
  • Over 1.6 million people have contracted the disease in Brazil, and more than 65,000 have died, per Johns Hopkins data.
  • Brazil's health ministry has frequently qualified its daily coronavirus death tolls with statements indicating the fatalities did not all take place within a 24-hour period, due to delays caused by investigations into the deaths.

The big picture: Bolsonaro joins U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Monaco's Prince Albert among the world leaders known to have tested positive.

  • One leader, President Pierre Nkurunziza of Burundi, may have died of COVID-19, though the government has said only that he died of heart failure.
  • Bolsonaro said he was taking hydroxychloroquine, which the FDA believes is "unlikely to be effective" in treating COVID-19.
  • He was photographed over the weekend celebrating America's Independence Day with officials including Brazil's foreign minister and the U.S. ambassador to Brazil.

Flashback: Bolsonaro had a coronavirus scare earlier this year, when his press secretary tested positive for the disease in March — days after meeting President Trump at Mar-a-Lago.

Go deeper: Pandemic meets political crisis in Brazil

Go deeper

Updated Oct 25, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trumpworld coronavirus tracker

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

An outbreak of COVID-19 has struck the White House — including the president himself — just weeks before the 2020 election.

Why it matters: If the president can get infected, anyone can. And the scramble to figure out the scope of this outbreak is a high-profile, high-stakes microcosm of America's larger failures to contain the virus and to stand up a contact-tracing system that can respond to new cases before they have a chance to become outbreaks.

Oct 15, 2020 - Health

Overdose deaths spiked in the first few months of 2020

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Overdose deaths increased by about 10% in the first three months of 2020, compared to the same time period last year, preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows.

What's next: The agency estimates the U.S. will suffer more than 75,500 drug-related deaths in 2020, surpassing last year's record.

Oct 15, 2020 - World

European countries push to combat coronavirus second wave without lockdowns

Police conduct coronavirus regulations checks in Hamburg, Germany. Chancellor Angela Merkel announced new measures Thursday, as the country reported a record number of new cases. Photo: Axel Heimken/picture alliance via Getty Images

Germany on Thursday became the latest European country to announce new restrictions this week amid record coronavirus case numbers. But governments are seeking to avoid a second round of nationwide lockdowns.

Why it matters: Widespread lockdowns to contain the spread of the virus have devastated economies around the world.