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A line of people wait to receive the COVID-19 vaccine in the Ciutat de les Arts i les Ciències de Valencia, on July 28, 2021. Photo: Rober Solsona/Europa Press via Getty Images

The member states of the European Union together have administered more coronavirus vaccine doses per 100 people than the United States, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: The new figures highlight the pace at which the 27 member states of the E.U. are vaccinating their citizens, and stand in stark contrast to the speed of vaccinations in the U.S., which has stagnated.

The big picture: During the early stages of the vaccine campaigns, E.U. countries lagged behind the U.S., Britain and Israel as the region faced a shortage of doses, the NYT reports.

  • "The catch-up process has been very successful," European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen told the New York Times on Tuesday.

Between the lines: Vaccinations have slowed in the U.S. as misinformation and skewed understanding of the risk of vaccines persist. But the majority of E.U. residents — 79% — say they intend to get vaccinated this year, per a public survey conducted across the bloc in May.

  • Around 75% of E.U. residents agree that vaccines are the only way to end the coronavirus pandemic, per the same survey.

By the numbers: E.U. countries had administered 102.66 doses per 100 people as of Tuesday, while the U.S. had administered 102.44, according to the latest vaccination figures compiled by Our World in Data.

  • Additionally, 58% of people across the E.U. have received a first dose of the coronavirus vaccine. In the U.S., 56.5% have.

Go deeper

United Airlines says 97% of U.S. employees fully vaccinated against COVID-19

Photo: James D. Morgan via Getty Images

United Airlines said Wednesday that over 97% of its U.S.-based employees are now fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to a company memo obtained by Axios.

Why it matters: United announced in August that it would require its 67,000 U.S.-based employees to get vaccinated by Sept. 27 or face termination. It's one of several airlines that set vaccine requirements even before President Biden issued his own vaccine mandate for employers with over 100 workers.

Sep 21, 2021 - Health

D.C. school employees required to get vaccinated

Photo: Jacquelyn Martin-Pool/Getty Images

All D.C. school and daycare employees — public, private, and charter — must be fully vaccinated by Nov. 1 with no option to test out, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser announced today.

  • Student athletes over the age of 12 will also be required to get vaccinated in order to participate in after-school programs, the mandate says. 
Sep 22, 2021 - Health

FDA approves Pfizer boosters for high-risk individuals, people 65 and up

Photo: Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus booster shots for people at high risk of severe COVID-19 and people 65 years and older.

Driving the news: The approval comes just days after an FDA advisory panel recommended boosters for the two groups but overwhelmingly voted against the third shots for younger Americans.