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Shipments of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine being loaded onto a plane in Lansing, Mich., Sunday. Photo: Rey Del Rio/Getty Images

Some states expect to make cuts to essential parts of their budgets — like education, transportation and health care — in order to pay for coronavirus vaccine distribution, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Why it matters: States say they need billions that they don't have to set up vaccination clinics, ensure storage capacity, organize community outreach and hire medical workers.

  • Meanwhile, increased funding for state and local governments is one of the most contentious aspects of a potential coronavirus relief package that is still being negotiated in Congress.

Driving the news: UPS and FedEx are set to deliver 2.9 million doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to about 150 locations in all 50 states by Monday, Operation Warp Speed's Gen. Gustave Perna said this weekend.

What they're saying: Some members of the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, which voted to recommend the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for people 16 years and older, urged for more federal funding on Saturday.

  • Beth Bell, a member of ACIP and global health expert from the University of Washington, said, "the imbalance" of funds the federal government had put toward vaccine development compared to distribution "is really shocking and needs to be corrected because we are not going to be able to protect the American public if we don’t have a way to deliver the vaccines to them,” CNBC reports.
  • Pediatrician and ACIP member Peter Szilagyi highlighted the “need for substantially increased government funding to actually implement the recommendation.”

Go deeper

Scammers have stolen over $130 million in coronavirus-related schemes

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Over 100,000 Americans have collectively reported roughly $132 million in fraud losses from scams related to the coronavirus and government stimulus checks since the March start of the pandemic, according to the Federal Trade Commission.

Why it matters: Coronavirus-related fraud complaints peaked in May when the IRS began sending its first round of stimulus checks. Congress recently proposed a second round of stimulus.

Jan 26, 2021 - Health

U.K. surpasses 100,000 COVID-19 deaths

Photo: Owen Humphreys/PA Images via Getty Images

The U.K. on Tuesday surpassed 100,000 coronavirus deaths almost a year after the first two cases were reported in the country, according to government figures.

Why it matters: It is the first European country and fifth country in the world to reach the threshold. The country reported 100,162 deaths on Tuesday.