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Joe Biden speaking in Hagerstown, Maryland, Oct. 6. Photo: Brendan Smualowski/AFP via Getty Images

Joe Biden said Tuesday when asked about facing President Trump in the second presidential debate on Oct. 15, "I think if he still has COVID, we shouldn’t have a debate."

Why it matters: Trump was diagnosed with the coronavirus last week. Though he was discharged from Walter Reed Medical Center on Monday evening and his physician said he's not experiencing symptoms, a person can be contagious up to 10 days after the symptoms resolve, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

What they're saying: "I think if he still has COVID, we shouldn’t have a debate," Biden said. "I think we are gonna have to follow very strict guidelines.

  • "Too many people have been infected. It's a very serious problem, so I will be guided by the guidelines of the Cleveland Clinic and what the docs say is the right thing to do."

The other side: "President Trump will be healthy and will be there," said Tim Murtaugh, director of the president's campaign. "There's no getting out of this one for Biden and his protectors in the media can’t cover for him."

The big picture: President Trump was not experiencing coronavirus symptoms and is doing "extremely well," according to a memo released by White House physician Sean Conley on Tuesday.

  • However, Conley said in a briefing on Monday that while the president's condition is improving, he "may not be entirely out of the woods yet" and the next few days will be critical to the course of his recovery.

Go deeper

Jan 10, 2021 - Health

Capitol physician warns lawmakers may have been exposed to COVID while hiding from mob

Pro-Trump rioters inside the Capitol Rotunda on Jan. 6. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Capitol's attending physician reportedly warned lawmakers on Sunday that they may have been exposed to someone with a coronavirus infection as they hid from a pro-Trump mob breaching the building on Wednesday.

Why it matters: Many members of Congress are in age groups that put them at a higher risk of dying or suffering serious illness associated with COVID-19.

Updated Jan 12, 2021 - Health

Third lawmaker tests positive for COVID-19 after Capitol Hill siege

Schneider. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Three Democratic lawmakers have announced they've tested positive for COVID-19 after sheltering with maskless colleagues during last week's siege at the U.S. Capitol.

Driving the news: Rep. Brad Schneider (D-Ill.) said wrote in a statement Tuesday that he has tested positive for the virus after the attack last week, during which he had to shelter in a crowded space with other lawmakers.

In photos: Protests outside fortified capitols draw only small groups

Armed members of the far-right extremist group the Boogaloo Bois near the Michigan Capitol Building in Lansing on Jan. 17. About 20 protesters showed up, AP notes. Photo: Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images

Small groups of protesters gathered outside fortified statehouses across the U.S. over the weekend ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

The big picture: Some protests attracted armed members of far-right extremist groups but there were no reports of clashes, as had been feared. The National Guard and law enforcement outnumbered demonstrators, as security was heightened around the U.S. to avoid a repeat of the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riots, per AP.