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Photo: Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

2020 Democrat Sen. Bernie Sanders invoked former President Franklin D. Roosevelt Wednesday in what his campaign billed as a "major address" on democratic socialism at George Washington University.

"Today I am proposing we complete the unfinished work of Franklin Roosevelt and the Democratic Party by putting forth a 21st Century Economic Bill of Rights. That means: The right to a decent job that pays a living wage; The right to health care; The right to a quality education; The right to affordable housing; The right to a clean environment and the right to a secure retirement. ... Over the course of this election my campaign has been releasing -- and will continue to release -- detailed proposals addressing each of these yet to be realized economic rights."

Why it matters: Sanders contended on Tuesday that the U.S. is more ready for a democratic socialist president than when he ran in 2016, but argued that his definition of the term is not the same as the one President Trump will use to attack him. He reiterated that stance in Wednesday's speech.

"While President Trump and his fellow oligarchs attack us for our support of democratic socialism, they don’t really oppose all forms of socialism.
They may hate democratic socialism because it benefits working people, but they absolutely love corporate socialism that enriches Trump and other billionaires."

The big picture: Socialism is losing its Soviet-era stigma, a Harris poll for "Axios on HBO" shows. The poll found 4 in 10 Americans would prefer living in a socialist country over a capitalist one — and it's the preferred system of 55% of women age 18–54.

Go deeper: Bernie Sanders on the issues, in under 500 words

Go deeper

Scoop: Anthony Coley to lead Justice Department public affairs

The U.S. Department of Justice building in Washington, D.C. Photo: Xinhua/Ting Shen via Getty Images

Judge Merrick Garland, President Biden’s nominee for attorney general, has tapped Anthony Coley, an Obama-era Treasury Department official, to serve as a senior adviser and lead public affairs at the Department of Justice, according to people familiar with the matter.

Why it matters: As the public face of the DOJ, Coley will help explain — and defend — the department's actions, from sensitive cases to prosecutorial decisions, including the investigation into Hunter Biden.

AP: Justice Dept. rescinds "zero tolerance" policy

A young girl waves to onlookers through the fence at the US-Mexico border wall at Friendship Park in San Ysidro, California in Nov. 2018. Photo: Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden's acting Attorney General Monty Wilkinson issued a memo on Tuesday to revoke the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, which separated thousands of migrant children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border, AP first reported.

Driving the news: A recent report by Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz emphasized the internal chaos at the agency over the implementation of the policy, which resulted in 545 parents separated from their children as of October 2020.

Biden picks up his pen to change the tone on racial equity

Vice President Harris looks on as President Biden signs executives orders related to his racial equity agenda. Photo: Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images

President Biden is making a down payment on racial equity in a series of executive orders dealing with everything from private prisons to housing discrimination, treatment of Asian Americans and relations with indigenous tribes.

The big picture: Police reform and voting rights legislation will take time to pass in Congress. But with the stroke of his pen, one week into the job Biden is taking steps within his power as he seeks to change the tone on racial justice from former President Trump.

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