Stories by Graham Allison

Expert Voices

Huawei arrest marks escalation in the U.S.–China fight over 5G

A sign calling for the release of Huawei Technologies Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou is seen outside at British Columbia Superior Courts following her December 1 arrest in Canada
A sign calling for the release of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou outside the British Columbia Superior Courts in Vancouver, on Dec. 10. Photo: Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S.-directed arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou in Canada sounds an alarm for the increasingly contentious dynamic between China and the U.S.

Why it matters: When it comes to 5G, Huawei is the fastest horse in a thinning race, with potential to gain a monopoly in the next decade. But the U.S. has now launched a global campaign against the company without a serious domestic alternative for 5G infrastructure.

Expert Voices

How energy deals could cut the U.S.–China trade deficit

gas line on Alaskan coast
Facilities for Tesoro Refinery (R) and Agrium Nitrogen Operations and Conoco Phillips LNG (L) in Kenai, Alaska. Photo: Farah Nosh/Getty Images

When President Trump demanded that China cut its $375 billion trade deficit with the U.S. by $200 billion, Chinese officials and the U.S. press shrieked. It seemed impossible. However, there's a simple way for China to give Trump this “win”: buying $200 billion worth of American oil, as well as liquefied natural gas (LNG) from Alaska, Texas and Louisiana.

The details: Alaska is estimated to have nearly $1 trillion worth of LNG that it's eager to sell and heartland states have several trillion dollars’ worth of oil and gas reserves available for export. While there would be some delays in delivery — new production and transportation infrastructure would first have to be built — the trade deficit is measured by date of sale, so the impact would be seen right away.