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Ballots are counted at the Maricopa County Election Department after the presidential election in Phoenix, Arizona, on Nov. 5. Photo: Olivier Touron/AFP via Getty Images

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich (R) told Fox Business Network Wednesday there's "no evidence" of voter fraud in the state and "there are no facts that would lead anyone to believe that the election results will change."

Why it matters: President Trump filed lawsuits in Arizona and other swing states in an effort to change the outcome of President-elect Biden's projected election win.

  • While none of the suits are expected to change the race outcome, they may delegitimize the election in the eyes of Trump supporters — some of whom protested outside an Ariz. election center last week as elections officials counted votes inside in the state that Biden is projected to win.

The state of play: In Ariz., Trump re-election campaign attorneys allege Maricopa County incorrectly rejected votes cast by in-person voters on Election Day, and they argued that evidence they say supports this should be sealed.

  • But a judge in the state on Tuesday agreed with elections officials who urged the court not to do so because the public "has a right to know how flimsy Plaintiffs' evidence actually is," the Arizona Republic reports.

What he's saying: Brnovich noted to Fox Business anchor Neil Cavuto that the votes being contested represent less than 200 ballots, so even if those votes were flipped, it's unlikely to make a difference to the presidential election outcome.

  • "Right now, there is less than 50,000 votes to count, and the president would have to get about 65% of them to win Arizona, so it does appear that Joe Biden will win Arizona," he said.
  • "[I]f indeed there was some great conspiracy, it apparently didn't work since the county election official who was Democrat lost and other Republicans won. ... it came down to people split their ticket."

The bottom line: "People vote for Republicans down ballot, but they didn't vote for President Trump," Brnovich said.

Go deeper

Updated 17 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Barr says DOJ has not seen evidence of fraud that would change election results

Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Attorney General Bill Barr told AP on Tuesday that the Department of Justice has not uncovered evidence of widespread voter fraud that would change the outcome of the 2020 presidential election.

Why it matters: It's a direct repudiation of President Trump's baseless claims of a "rigged" election from one of the most loyal members of his Cabinet.

Georgia election official to Trump: Condemn “potential acts of violence”

Gabriel Sterling. Photo: Jessica McGowan via Getty

Gabriel Sterling, Georgia’s voting implementation manager, called on President Trump and the state's Republican senators to denounce threats against election workers in a press conference on Tuesday.

Why it matters: State election workers have been the recipients of death threats after conspiracy theorists shared false videos about the election results on social media. Trump and his allies continue to claim widespread election fraud took place in the state.

32 mins ago - Sports

The end of COVID’s grip on sports may be in sight

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Packed stadiums and a more normal fan experience could return by late 2021, NIAID director Anthony Fauci said yesterday.

Why it matters: If Fauci's prediction comes true, it could save countless programs from going extinct next year.