Jan 27, 2020

23% of Americans say they cut back on meat in 2019

Heirloom tomatoes in Denver, Colo., in 2019. Photo: Robert Alexander/Getty Images

A Gallup survey found that 23% of 2,431 adults reported eating less meat in the past year than they had in 2018, while the vast majority (72%) say they ate the same amount of meat.

Why it matters: A meat-intensive diet can increase a person's chances of developing certain illnesses like heart disease and require more resources to produce compared to a vegetable-based diet.

The big picture: 67% of U.S. adults said they eat beef, chicken or pork "frequently," while 23% said they eat meat "occasionally" and 7% "rarely" eat it. Just 3% reported "never" eating meat.

  • Women were about twice as likely as men to report having cut down on meat consumption.

Methodology: This survey was conducted Sept. 16-30, 2019, with a random sample of 2,431 adults, aged 18 and older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. For results based on the total sample of national adults, the margin of sampling error is ±2 percentage points at the 95% confidence level.

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Kitchen matches: Plant-based meats fire up fast-food traffic and sales

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The fast-food industry has fallen in love with plant-based "meats" and the boost in foot traffic and sales they provide from more health- and climate-conscious consumers.

Why it matters: The public’s growing interest in plant-based "meat" has start-ups trying to scale up and expand their market share, and food giants, such as Tyson Foods, are trying to muscle—and cash—in. The plant-based meat industry has seen $12.6 billion in sales and $4.5 billion in revenue as of July 2019, according to the Plant Based Food Association, and such non-meat burgers were estimated to be in 7,200 Burger Kings, 1,000 Carl's Jrs., and hundreds of other fast-food joints at the close of 2019.

Go deeperArrowJan 25, 2020

Beyond Meat tests "fake" fried chicken across the South

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Beyond Meat is testing its plant-based chicken in KFC locations for three weeks across Tennessee, North Carolina and Kentucky, the company recently announced.

The big picture: McDonald's is one of the only major fast-food restaurants that has not embraced the fake meat boom, the Washington Post reports.

Fake meat may have some real problems

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Beyond Meat's stock price fell by 4.3% on Wednesday after Canadian fast food giant Tim Hortons announced it was pulling Beyond burgers from its menu.

Why it matters: Beyond Meat was one of 2019's biggest success stories — at its peak the stock rose 840% from its IPO price.

Go deeperArrowJan 30, 2020