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Former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams in Atlanta, Georgia in November. Photo: Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Stacey Abrams' voting rights group enacted a multimillion-dollar ad campaign Tuesday, calling out Republican bills it says are designed to suppress voting in Georgia, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution first reported.

Why it matters: Republicans in battleground states like Georgia are "adding barriers to mail-in and early voting" — both of which helped President Biden win the state in November and assisted Sens. Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock in taking the two Ga. seats that gave Democrats balance of power in the Senate, according to AP.

  • Per the public policy group the Brennan Center for Justice, 33 states have "introduced, prefiled, or carried over 165 restrictive bills this year."

Driving the news: Georgia's Republican-controlled Senate voted along party lines Tuesday in favor of a proposed law requiring more identification for absentee voting —  the first in a "raft of elections legislation," the AJC notes. 

  • Republican state Rep. Barry Fleming filed a bill last Thursday that would end Sunday voting, require ID for absentee ballots and limit drop boxes.
  • He says the bill "creates more uniformity to guide counties to run elections and restores confidence in the election system," the Georgia Recorder reports.
  • But NPR notes Fleming's plan would reduce the timelines for Georgia voters to request absentee ballots and for county officials to send them out.

Of note: Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger (R) said last December while continuing to push back on former President Trump's baseless elections fraud claims that no-excuse absentee voting "opens the door to potential illegal voting," per AP.

What they're saying: The Fair Fight Action ad focuses on voting by mail, which the group notes Georgians of both parties have used as a method for decades.

"Almost half a million Georgia Republicans did it just last year. The GOP knows voting by mail works, it was their idea. It's how Republicans have been winning Florida. But now, the same Georgia politicians who passed these laws want to make voting harder. That means longer lines, higher taxes, harder for you."
— Excerpt from Fair Fight Action's ad

Go deeper: Dozens of states see new voter suppression proposals

Go deeper

Feb 23, 2021 - Politics & Policy

David Perdue will not run for Senate seat in Georgia in 2022

Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Former Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.) announced Tuesday that he will not enter the race for U.S. Senate in Georgia in 2022.

Why it matters: The 2022 election will play a key role in determining which party controls the Senate after Republicans — including Perdue — lost two Georgia seats to Democrats during last month's dual runoffs.

Dave Lawler, author of World
1 hour ago - World

Americans increasingly see China as an enemy

One in three Americans, and a majority of Republicans, now view China as an enemy of the United States, according to a new survey from Pew Research Center.

By the numbers: Just 9% of Americans consider China a "partner," while 55% see Beijing as a "competitor" and 34% as an "enemy."

Scoop: Leaked HHS docs spotlight Biden's child migrant dilemma

A group of undocumented immigrants walk toward a Customs and Border Patrol station after being apprehended. Photo: Sergio Flores/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Fresh internal documents from the Department of Health and Human Services show how quickly the number of child migrants crossing the border is overwhelming the administration's stretched resources.

Driving the news: In the week ending March 1, the Border Patrol referred to HHS custody an average of 321 children per day, according to documents obtained by Axios. That's up from a weekly average of 203 in late January and early February — and just 47 per day during the first week of January.

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