Sep 12, 2019

145 CEOs urge Senate to pass gun control legislation

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

145 top CEOs signed a letter urging the Republican-controlled Senate to act on gun control by passing legislation already introduced by Democrats, reports the New York Times.

The big picture: Corporate America is taking the lead in tackling gun control. Multiple retail companies, including Walmart and CVS, are asking customers to not openly carry firearms in their stores. After a deadly shooting at an El Paso Walmart killed 22 people, Walmart stores stopped selling ammunition for handguns and assault rifles.

What they're saying: The letter asks the Senate to pass legislation requiring background checks on all gun sales and a strong red flag law, which allows courts to issue risk protection orders.

"[W]e are writing to you because we have a responsibility and obligation to stand up for the safety of our employees, customers and all Americans in the communities we serve across the country. Doing nothing about America's gun violence crisis is simply unacceptable and it is time to stand with the American public on gun safety."

Some of the CEOs who signed the letter:

  • Joshua Kushner, Founder of Thrive Capital and brother of Jared Kushner
  • Jack Dorsey, CEO of Twitter
  • Brian Chesky, CEO of Airbnb
  • Ethan Brown, CEO of Beyond Meat
  • Edward Stack, CEO of Dick's Sporting Goods
  • Chip Bergh, CEO of Levi Strauss
  • Dara Khosrowshahi, CEO of Uber
  • Steve Pagliuca, Co-Chair of Bain Capital — a private equity firm co-founded by Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah)

Worth noting: A recent poll by Edelman Intelligence found that a majority of U.S. adults would feel more favorably toward a company whose CEO supports tougher background checks for guns.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

George Floyd updates

Thousands of protesters march over the Brooklyn Bridge on June 4 in New York City. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

All four former Minneapolis police officers have been charged for George Floyd’s death and are in custody, including Thomas Lane, J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao, who were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

The latest: Civil rights groups filed a lawsuit Thursday against President Trump, Attorney General Bill Barr and other federal officials on behalf of Black Lives Matter and other peaceful protesters who were forcibly removed with rubber bullets and chemical irritants before Trump's photo-op at the historic St. John’s Episcopal Church on Monday.

Trump says he will campaign against Lisa Murkowski after her support for Mattis

Trump with Barr and Meadows outside St. John's Episcopal church in Washington, D.C. on June 1. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Thursday that he would endorse "any candidate" with a pulse who runs against Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska).

Driving the news: Murkowski said on Thursday that she supported former defense secretary James Mattis' condemnation of Trump over his response to protests in the wake of George Floyd's killing. She described Mattis' statement as "true, honest, necessary and overdue," Politico's Andrew Desiderio reports.

59 mins ago - World

The president vs. the Pentagon

Trump visits Mattis and the Pentagon in 2018. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty

Over the course of just a few hours, President Trump was rebuffed by the Secretary of Defense over his call for troops in the streets and accused by James Mattis, his former Pentagon chief, of trampling the Constitution for political gain.

Why it matters: Current and former leaders of the U.S. military are drawing a line over Trump's demand for a militarized response to the protests and unrest that have swept the country over the killing of George Floyd by police.