Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky attends a meeting in a Parliamentary Hall in Kyiv, Ukraine, in July. Photo: Sergii Kharchenko/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky issued a statement on his Facebook page Saturday stating that it "is never and under no circumstances acceptable to interfere with another country's sovereign elections."

Why it matters: National Counterintelligence and Security Center Director William Evanina said Friday the Russian government had taken action to "denigrate former Vice President Biden" before November's election and that a "pro-Russia" Ukrainian lawmaker was "spreading claims about corruption" to "undermine" the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee.

What he's saying: Zelensky said in his statement he wanted to "assure our partners that Ukraine did not allow and will not allow itself to intervene in the future in the elections and thereby harm our trustworthy and sincere partnerships with the United States."

  • He added that Ukrainian citizens should "refrain from any activity related to the US presidential election and not allow themselves to try to solve any of their personal political or business problems."

Of note: Trump and his allies have previously pushed unfounded claims that Ukraine interfered in the 2016 elections. The fourth volume of a Senate Intelligence Committee report affirms the intelligence community's conclusion that Russia interfered in the election to help President Trump defeat 2016 presidential rival Hillary Clinton.

Flashback: Trump-Ukraine scandal: The key players, dates and documents

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Energetic Bear, a Russian state-sponsored hacking group, has stolen data from two servers after targeting state and federal government networks in the U.S. since at least September, the FBI and Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency said on Thursday.

Driving the news: Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe announced Wednesday that Iran and Russia had obtained voter registration information that could be used to undermine confidence in the U.S. election system.

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In photos: Coronavirus restrictions grow across Europe

A skeleton is placed at a restaurant table in Rome to protest Italy's restrictions that'll see gyms, movie theaters and pools close and bars and restaurants required to shut by 6 p.m. until at least Nov. 24. Photo: Antonio Masiello/Getty Images

Restrictions are returning across much of Europe as the continent faces a second coronavirus wave.

The big picture: Spain and France each surpassed 1 million cases last week, and both countries have implemented further restrictions on citizens. Italian officials announced strict new measures, effective Monday, to combat another cases spike. From Denmark to Romania, take a look at what steps countries have been taking, in photos.