Wisconsin's state Speaker Robin Vos (R) defended the Wisconsin Supreme Court's decision to host primary elections Tuesday in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, telling a reporter with The Journal Times: "You are incredibly safe to go out."

Why it matters: Vos made the comments while donning a mask, gloves and protective gown, an image that underscored the health concerns that many have expressed about Tuesday's elections.

  • The speaker, who was working as an election inspector at a polling place in Racine County, said that election officials gave him the protective gear and said it was "mandatory to wear it."

What he's saying: "You can come to a polling place and do it safely. You have the ability to do curbside voting," Vos said. "People have to use their own best judgment."

  • "They have to make sure that if they're compromised in any way or worried about the safety of their family, they do it really smartly. But I look at what's happening here today and it really makes me proud," he added.

The big picture: Gov. Tony Evers issued an executive order attempting to delay the state's primary election on Monday, but the Wisconsin Supreme Court struck it down and ruled that the election must go on as scheduled. Republicans refused to work with Evers to delay the election and are seeking to win a key state Supreme Court race.

Go deeper ... In photos: Wisconsin votes as coronavirus crisis intensifies

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Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
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Why it matters: Confidence among chief executives jumped 19 points from its last reading in July, rising above the 50-point threshold that reflects more positive than negative responses for the first time since 2018.

Louisville officer: "Breonna Taylor would be alive" if we had served no-knock warrant

Breonna Taylor memorial in Louisville. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, the Louisville officer who led the botched police raid that caused the death of Breonna Taylor, said the No. 1 thing he wishes he had done differently is either served a "no-knock" warrant or given five to 10 seconds before entering the apartment: "Breonna Taylor would be alive, 100 percent."

Driving the news: Mattingly, who spoke to ABC News and Louisville's Courier Journal for his public interview, was shot in the leg in the initial moments of the March 13 raid. Mattingly did not face any charges after Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said he and another officer were "justified" in returning fire to protect themselves against Taylor's boyfriend.

U.S. vs. Google — the siege begins

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Justice Department fired the starter pistol on what's likely to be a years-long legal siege of Big Tech by the U.S. government when it filed a major antitrust suit Tuesday against Google.

The big picture: Once a generation, it seems, federal regulators decide to take on a dominant tech company. Two decades ago, Microsoft was the target; two decades before that, IBM.