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Health workers at a cordoned-off section of the international airport in Wuhan, China, as the World Health Organization team arrives on Thursday. Photo: Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images

A World Health Organization team of researchers arrived in Wuhan, China, Thursday ahead of their investigation into the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Driving the news: Dominic Dwyer, a Sydney virologist based who's among the scientists on the visit, told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation they don't expect to find a "patient zero." "But we may have a much better indication of whether the virus truly started in Wuhan," he said.

  • "Or did it start somewhere else but was then amplified in Wuhan? Did it come from an animal source and if so, which one? What was the role of laboratories in all of this? I think we'll have a better idea," Dwyer added.

The big picture: The WHO agreed last May to a call from over 110 countries to lead an independent review of the global coronavirus response after China backed the move following clashes with Australia, which had earlier advocated for a sweeping inquiry.

  • But the visit has been hit by delays. Earlier this month, Chinese officials delayed authorization to allow the international team's scheduled visit — drawing a rare rebuke from World Health Organization director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.
  • An AP investigation last month found the ruling Chinese Communist Party enforced controls on research into the outbreak and blocked scientists from being interviewed by reporters.

What's next: The WHO team will undergo two weeks of quarantine before they start their research.

Flashback: Timeline: The early days of China's coronavirus outbreak and cover-up

Go deeper

AAPI leaders praise order on discrimination but say Biden needs to do more to "prioritize" community

President Biden on the left. Rep. Judy Chu on the right. Photos: Doug Mills-Pool (left) and Paul Morigi/WireImage for The Recording Academy (right) via Getty

Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) lawmakers, community organizers and advocacy groups commended President Biden's Tuesday order directing an examination of anti-Asian bias and discrimination, but pushed the administration to commit to stronger action.

Why it matters: Anti-Asian hate crimes have surged since the pandemic began, reaching more than 2,500 in August according to Stop AAPI Hate, an initiative that tracks anti-AAPI racism.

11 hours ago - Health

One year of the coronavirus

One year ago today, a novel coronavirus was barely beginning to catch the public's eye. There were just over 2,000 confirmed cases worldwide, mostly in China, and five cases in the U.S.

The big picture: The sea of red says it all. Today, there have been over 100 million cases worldwide, led by the U.S. with 25 million.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
11 hours ago - Health

Vaccine hesitancy is decreasing in the U.S.

Reproduced from KFF ; Chart: Axios Visuals

An increasing number of Americans say they want to get the coronavirus vaccine as soon as possible, per new KFF polling.

Yes, but: Race, partisanship and geography still serve as major dividing lines for vaccine enthusiasm. And people of color are less likely than white Americans to say they have been vaccinated themselves or know someone who has.