The White House's coronavirus task force announced tougher guidelines on Monday to help slow the spread of the disease, including limiting social gatherings of more than 10 people.

Why it matters: The tougher guidelines, which will be in place for at least a 15-day period, come as the number of reported cases in the U.S. has surpassed 4,000. President Trump said the changes to everyday life as a result of the crisis could be the "new normal" in the U.S. until July or August.

Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus coordinator, recommended the following measures during a press briefing on Monday:

  • If someone within your household is infected with the virus, everyone else within the home should also self-quarantine.
  • Avoid nonessential travel.
  • Avoid eating or drinking in bars and public food courts.

More highlights:

  • During the briefing, Trump said he does not currently plan to announce a national quarantine, but that restrictions could apply to certain coronavirus hotspots.
  • Trump conceded that the U.S. may be headed for a recession, but struck a new tone in emphasizing the public health impacts of the pandemic: "We're not thinking in terms of recession, we're thinking in terms of the virus," calling it an "invisible enemy."
  • Amid increasing pressure on the airline industry, Trump said the administration will "back the airlines 100%." He did not offer specifics on how they will do that.
  • Trump signaled that he's open to changes to the House coronavirus package that he previously endorsed. He said Senate Republicans "may make" the House bill "even better," adding that there may be further negotiations.
  • In one rare moment, Trump acknowledged that he thinks "a lot of the media has been very fair [during coverage of the virus]. I think people are pulling together on this."
  • Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a member of the task force, said people infected with the virus should not rely on how they are feeling to determine when it is safe to leave the home.
  • Fauci said people must have two negative cultures taken 24 hours apart to ensure they are healthy again.

The state of play: The stock markets, which closed during the briefing, had their worst day since 1987.

  • The S&P 500 closed more than 11% lower on Monday, while the Dow fell 13% (or 2,999 points).
  • Asked about the steep drop, Trump said: "The market will take care of itself."

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

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Senate to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation on Oct. 26

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) in the Capitol on Oct. 20. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

The Senate will vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court next Monday, Oct. 26, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) announced Tuesday.

The big picture: The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote this Thursday to advance Barrett's nomination to the full Senate floor. Democrats have acknowledged that there's nothing procedurally that they can do to stop Barrett's confirmation, which will take place just one week out from Election Day.

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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Meadows confirms Trump's tweets "declassifying" Russia documents were false

Photo: Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows confirmed in court on Tuesday that President Trump's tweets authorizing the disclosure of documents related to the Russia investigation and Hillary Clinton's emails "were not self-executing declassification orders," after a federal judge demanded that Trump be asked about his intentions.

Why it matters: BuzzFeed News reporter Jason Leopold cited the tweets in an emergency motion seeking to gain access to special counsel Robert Mueller's unredacted report as part of a Freedom of Information Act request. This is the first time Trump himself has indicated, according to Meadows, that his tweets are not official directives.