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Biden gives a foreign policy speech in New York in July. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

DETROIT, Mich. — The biggest lesson Joe Biden learned from the first debate is that there are no rules of engagement at these things, and he's ready to throw down at tonight's debate, according to five senior campaign officials.

What to watch: Yes, he's going to keep contrasting himself with President Trump. But he's squarely focused on Sen. Kamala Harris, too, after the first debate in Miami.

  • "We’re not joking when we say he’s not going to let his record be mischaracterized," said one senior campaign official. "It’s not OK to label someone as a racist."
  • They were referring to Harris' line to Biden at the last debate that started with: "I know you're not racist, but ... "
  • "Some folks are willing to go places we didn’t think they’d go,” said another senior Biden campaign official, who said they were surprised by Harris' exchange with him because she's been friends with Biden for years.
  • His team maintains he won't make any personal attacks against other Democrats, but Biden himself has said he won't be as "polite" as last time.

Why it matters: Any time Biden has to spend defending his record from other candidates' attacks is less time he'll have to take on Trump — something he's been doing since he launched his campaign, signaling he views himself as the eventual nominee.

Between the lines: Although Harris saw a bump in polling after her spat with Biden, his team believes that was temporary.

  • "This is not a new dynamic," said one senior Biden campaign official. "You see candidates who rise and the balloon pops once there’s more information on that person."
  • After the Miami debates, Harris reached 20% in a Quinnipiac poll, but she's since leveled back out at around 11%.

Health care dominated last night's discussion, which Biden watched, and he plans to present that as one of the major differences between himself and Harris, as well as Sen. Bernie Sanders.

The bottom line: Biden might be ready for a fight, but Harris is surely not the only one to go after him and his record, and that could introduce new vulnerabilities he's not yet anticipating.

Go deeper: Democrats prepare for debate brawl with Biden.

Go deeper

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
39 mins ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Wanted: New media bosses, everywhere

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.