Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on the day's biggest business stories

Subscribe to Axios Closer for insights into the day’s business news and trends and why they matter

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Editor's note: This was published in 2019, and Axios has since updated its privacy policy.

If you are a reader of Axios, either through our website or newsletters, we've collected some information about you.

Why it matters: We've written extensively about the data collection practices of big tech platforms. Media companies make money from free, ad-supported content and, in some cases, reader subscriptions — both of which require some level of data collection. Since we're turning this lens on so many other companies, we want to do our best to turn it on ourselves as well.

How Axios gets information: Today, Axios makes money primarily through advertisements on its website and newsletters.

  • When you sign up for newsletters, you provide an email address and the topics you are interested in. You also provide certain information when completing surveys or entering contests.
  • Axios does not collect any information when readers contact its newsroom through its email tip-line.
  • Axios uses "cookies" and other technology to track how you interact with Axios content. This information does not reveal who you are, but it is used to help tailor ads that are displayed while you are on the site.
  • Axios gets information from third-party data providers to learn more about you. For example, if you are a registered Axios user and also a registered user or another news site, and allow that site to share your info with other data providers, that data provider can share those details with Axios.

How Axios uses data: Your data is primarily used to deliver Axios services you've signed up for, like newsletters, to you.

  • Axios removes personally identifiable information, like your name, to make anonymous information for statistics. This info is used to determine which articles are most popular, how users are getting to those articles and how often they may return to the site.
  • Using anonymized data, Axios shares ad performance data back to advertisers. This may include how many people viewed or clicked on an ad, or your estimated income range based on data from a third-party vendor.

Axios may market other services to you if you've registered as a user. This is done in three ways:

  1. Based on information you provided, information collected via cookies on the site and information we may get from data providers.
  2. Axios partners with social media platforms like Facebook. For example, Axios might ask Facebook to monitor its website to identify users who read Axios, and then ask it to advertise a new economics newsletter to users who recently read an Axios economics article. (Facebook does not share your personal info with Axios.)
  3. Axios may share your information, like an email address, with its partners if you access Axios through a partner's service — but only to help deliver the most appropriate content to you or to manage your subscription.

What Axios doesn't do with your data: Axios does not track your location, or track your activity on sites that are not owned by Axios.

  • Axios does not sell personally identifiable information to data brokers.
  • Axios does not collect information on people beyond the content they read on the site and some data related to it, like their general location when they read it.
  • If, based on your IP address, we believe you are outside the U.S., Axios does not collect any data about you or serve ads to you.

What you can do: If you don't want Axios to collect any data about you, you can:

  • Unsubscribe to Axios newsletters or promotional emails (every email has an "unsubscribe" link).
  • Change your browser settings to block cookies.

Read Axios' privacy policy (updated April 2021).

Go deeper: Read the rest of the series.

Go deeper

Prosecutor: Fatal police shooting of Andrew Brown Jr. was "justified"

Khalil Ferebee (C), the son of Andrew Brown Jr., and attorneys Bakari Sellers (L) and Harry Daniel (R) at a May 11 news conference in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

A North Carolina prosecutor said Tuesday that the death of Andrew Brown Jr., a Black man fatally shot by sheriff's deputies last month, was "tragic" but "justified," due to the immediate threat officers believed Brown posed.

Why it matters: The FBI has opened a civil rights investigation into Brown's death. Police in Elizabeth City shot him five times, including in the back of his head, according to an independent autopsy report released by family attorneys last month.

McCarthy comes out against bipartisan deal on Jan. 6 commission

Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) will oppose a bipartisan deal announced last week that would form a 9/11-style commission to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, his office announced Tuesday.

Why it matters: McCarthy's opposition to the deal, which was negotiated by the top Republican and Democrat on the House Homeland Security Committee, underscores the internal divisions that continue to plague the GOP in the wake of Jan. 6.

2 hours ago - World

Beijing's antitrust push poses a problem for Western regulators

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Chinese government's anti-monopoly machinery presents a major challenge to U.S. and European regulators, a new book argues.

Why it matters: China's huge markets are attracting investment from multinational corporations and shaping the behavior of its own globe-trotting companies — giving international heft to the country's idiosyncratic antitrust enforcement and putting it on a collision course with Western-style regulation.

You’ve caught up. Now what?

Sign up for Mike Allen’s daily Axios AM and PM newsletters to get smarter, faster on the news that matters.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!