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Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

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A health worker takes a patient's temperature before sending them to be tested at a COVID-19 testing site in St. John's Well Child and Family Center, Los Angeles, California. Photo: Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. surpassed 10 million confirmed COVID-19 cases on Monday, according to Johns Hopkins data.

Why it matters: The U.S. has reported over 100,000 new coronavirus cases every day since last Wednesday, when it first passed the threshold, per the COVID Tracking Project.

The big picture: COVID-19 hospitalizations have risen by 10,000 since Oct. 30, and the seven-day average of deaths from the virus reported by states has increased 36% in the past three weeks, the COVID Tracking Project notes.

  • One in every 462 people in the U.S. tested positive for the virus in the week leading up to Saturday.
  • The 10 million-case milestone comes the same day that pharmaceutical giant Pfizer announced its vaccine trial was effective in preventing COVID-19 infections in 90% of previously uninfected people and did not produce any serious safety concerns.

Go deeper: Biden unveils coronavirus crisis team tasked with curbing surging cases

Go deeper

CDC to cut guidance on quarantine period for coronavirus exposure

A health care worker oversees cars as people arrive to get tested for coronavirus at a testing site in Arlington, Virginia, on Tuesday. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The CDC will soon shorten its guidance for quarantine periods following exposure to COVID-19, AP reported Tuesday and Axios can confirm.

Why it matters: Quarantine helps prevent the spread of the coronavirus, which can occur before a person knows they're sick or if they're infected without feeling any symptoms. The current recommended period to stay home if exposed to the virus is 14 days. The CDC plans to amend this to 10 days or seven with a negative test, an official told Axios.

  • The CDC did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
Updated Nov 30, 2020 - Health

Key information about the effective COVID-19 vaccines

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The race for a COVID-19 vaccine is ramping up, with three major candidates now reporting efficacy rates of more than 90%.

Why it matters: Health experts say the world can't fully return to normal until a coronavirus vaccine is widely distributed. But each potential vaccine has its own nuances, and it's likely that multiple vaccines will be needed in order to supply enough doses for universal vaccination.

14 hours ago - Health

CDC panel: COVID vaccines should go to health workers, long-term care residents first

Hospital staff work in the COVID-19 intensive care unit in Houston. Photo: Go Nakamura via Getty

Health-care workers and nursing home residents should be at the front of the line to get coronavirus vaccines in the United States once they’re cleared and available for public use, an independent CDC panel recommended in a 13-1 emergency vote on Tuesday, per CNBC.

Why it matters: Recent developments in COVID-19 vaccines have accelerated the timeline for distribution as vaccines developed by Pfizer and Moderna undergo the federal approval process. States are preparing to begin distributing as soon as two weeks from now.

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