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Front-line worker receiving a free haircut in New York City. Photo: Noam Galai/Getty Images

The U.S. on Saturday reported more than 33,000 new confirmed cases of the coronavirus, the highest total since May 1, CNBC reports, citing Johns Hopkins data.

Why it matters: It's a sign that the outbreak isn't slowing down nationwide, even as the number of new cases in original hotspots like New York continues to drop. States like California, Texas, Florida and Arizona are reporting a surge of infections as they move to fully reopen parts of the economy and return to normal life.

Between the lines: President Trump claimed at a rally on Saturday that he told officials to slow down testing, blaming an increase in testing capacity for the growth in new cases. While his campaign later said he was joking, Trump also called testing "overrated" in an interview with the Wall Street Journal earlier in the week.

  • The significant spike in cases in several states isn't solely attributable to more testing.
  • And Arizona, Texas, North Carolina and Alabama have also hit record hospitalizations in the last few days — a metric that isn't skewed by increased testing.

By the numbers: As of Sunday morning, the U.S. had reported 2.25 million total cases of the coronavirus and more than 119,000 deaths.

The bottom line: "I don't like to talk about a second wave right now, because we haven't gotten out of our first wave," Anthony Fauci recently told The Daily Beast.

Go deeper ... Map: The states where coronavirus cases are surging

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
Sep 29, 2020 - World

Global coronavirus death toll crosses 1 million

Data: Our World in Data; Chart: Sara Wise/Axios

The global toll of confirmed deaths from COVID-19 crossed 1 million on Monday, according to data from Johns Hopkins.

By the numbers: More than half of those deaths have come in four countries: the U.S. (204,762), Brazil (141,741), India (95,542) and Mexico (76,430). The true global death toll is likely far higher.

Sep 28, 2020 - Health

Trump announces plan to distribute 150 million rapid coronavirus tests

President Trump announced on Monday that the federal government will distribute 150 million rapid, point-of-care coronavirus tests to states over the next few weeks, including to K-12 schools and vulnerable communities like nursing homes and assisted living facilities.

Why it matters: The Trump administration has stressed the importance of reopening schools in allowing parents to return to work and jumpstarting the economy.

Fauci: Some of what Fox News reports about COVID-19 is "outlandish"

NIAID Director Anthony Fauci told CNN Monday that "some of the things" Fox News reports about the coronavirus "are outlandish."

What he's saying: "If you listen to Fox News, with all due respect to the fact that they do have some good reporters, some of the things that they report there are outlandish, to be honest with you," Fauci said in speaking about misinformation surrounding the coronavirus.