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Photo: Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Twitter on Thursday labeled a tweet from Russian state media outlet RT (formerly Russia Today) that included a video implying widespread voter fraud is plaguing, and potentially delegitimizing, the U.S. election.

Why it matters: It's the first time Twitter has labeled RT's account with a civic integrity label, or a designation used to highlight efforts to manipulate or interfere in elections or other civic processes.

What they're saying: "We placed a label on the Tweet you referenced for making potentially misleading claims that could undermine confidence in the election, and to offer more context for anyone who may see the Tweet," a Twitter spokesperson said. "This action is in line with our updated Civic Integrity Policy."

Earlier this month, Twitter said it would expand the number of labels it put on tweets to help curb the spread of misinformation surrounding the U.S. election.

The big picture: Intelligence officials have warned that Russia is meddling in the U.S. election, and using strategic disinformation campaigns as a weapon to do so.

  • On Thursday, former Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats told CBS News' Norah O'Donnell that the intelligence community has "full confidence that the Russians are going after our elections," despite the fact that President Trump has disputed that claim.

Be smart: Russia will often deploy disinformation using its state-backed media accounts, with hopes that other domestic media outlets will pick it up.

The marked tweet, featured below, cannot be shared or commented on.

A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

Go deeper

Twitter pilots feature allowing users to add context to misleading tweets

Photo: Lionel Bonaventure/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter on Monday announced a new feature, called Birdwatch, aimed at combating misinformation and disinformation with a "community-driven approach" that allows users to add context to tweets they believe are misleading.

How it works: The new feature, which is being piloted in the U.S., "allows people to identify information in tweets they believe is misleading and write notes that provide informative context," Twitter's vice president for product Keith Coleman wrote in a blog post.

Jan 26, 2021 - Technology

Twitter acquiring newsletter publishing company Revue

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Twitter on Tuesday said it has acquired Revue, a newsletter platform for writers and publishers.

Why it matters: The deal marks Twitter's first step into building out long-form content experiences on Twitter, and its first foray into subscription revenue.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
6 mins ago - Energy & Environment

IEA analysis charts "narrow" pathway to Paris climate goal

Photovoltaic solar panels at the power plant in La Colle des Mees, Alpes de Haute Provence, southeastern France. Photo: Gerard Julien/AFP via Getty Images

The pathway for transforming global energy systems to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 is "narrow but still achievable" and demands unprecedented acceleration away from fossil fuels, an International Energy Agency report published Tuesday concludes.

Why it matters: It provides detailed analysis and estimates of what's needed for a good shot at limiting temperature rise to 1.5°C above preindustrial levels — the Paris Agreement benchmark for avoiding some of the most damaging effects of climate change.