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Photo: Omar Marques/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Twitter said Friday it would be making a slew of significant new product and enforcement changes to help clamp down on misinformation leading up to the election.

Why it matters: It's the most aggressive set of changes that Twitter has rolled out to date to curb election-related misinformation on its platform.

Details: Twitter said that beginning next week, it would officially take action on tweets that claim an election win before it's authoritatively called.

  • Twitter will require either an announcement from state election officials, or a public projection from at least two authoritative, national news outlets that make independent calls.
  • Tweets that include premature claims will be labeled and will direct users to Twitter's official U.S. election page, the tech giant said.
  • Tweets meant to incite interference with the election process or with the implementation of election results — such as through violent action —will be subject to removal.

The tech giant will also be labeling more tweets.

  • Beginning next week, it will prompt users to seek credible information about a topic if they try to retweet a tweet with a misleading information label on it.
  • In addition to those prompts, it will add additional warnings and restrictions on tweets with a misleading information label from U.S. political figures, and U.S.-based accounts with more than 100,000 followers, or accounts that have significant engagement. Users will have to tap through a warning to see those tweets.
  • Users will only be able to quote tweet those tweets. Likes, retweets and replies will be turned off, and these tweets won’t be algorithmically recommended by Twitter.

Between the lines: The tech giant is also rolling out three new updates on October 20 to make sure misinformation about results won't spread. These updates are temporary, but do to the unusual nature of the election, Twitter says it doesn't know yet when these changes will be lifted.

  1. Twitter says it will encourage people to add their own commentary to retweets, via a "quote tweet" prior to amplifying content. This has been something that the firm has openly discussed tested for some time.
  2. It will prevent “liked by” and “followed by” recommendations from people that users don’t follow from showing up in their timeline. Twitter says it won't send notifications for these tweets to ensure that people don't pile onto conversations going viral. They hope this will curb misinformation from spreading.
  3. Twitter says it will only surface trends in the “For You” tab in the United States that includes additional context, meaning it will include a description tweet or article "that represents or summarizes why that term is trending."

The big picture: Twitter has been credited for taken swift and more decisive action on political misinformation this cycle than last. Most notably, the tech giant announced last year that it would ban political advertising, a move that was followed by major political advertising changes by some of its peers.

Go deeper

Big Tech scrambles to prevent inauguration threats

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Big Tech companies are scrambling to take action to prevent Inauguration Day violence, taking matters into their own hands after the government was caught ill-prepared for last week's Capitol siege.

What's happening: Major firms are taking a range of steps to stop their platforms from being used to plan, incite or carry out violent acts in Washington, D.C.

Updated 4 mins ago - Sports

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Team USA's Simone Biles watching the women's uneven bars final at the Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan, on Sunday. Photo: Jamie Squire/Getty Images

🚨: Simone Biles will compete in her final Olympic event

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🏅Norwegian gold medalist, U.S. silver medalist smash 400m hurdles world record

🏋️‍♀️: Transgender weightlifter Laurel Hubbard: "It gets better"

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⚽: U.S. women's soccer team falls to Canada in semifinals, ending chances at gold

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Raven Saunders: U.S. athletes planned "X" protests "for weeks"

Team USA's Raven Saunders makes an "X'" gesture during the medal ceremony for the Women's Shot Put at the Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan, on Sunday. Photo: Ryan Pierse/Getty Images

Raven Saunders, the American Olympian facing a possible investigation for making a protest gesture on the podium over the weekend, told the New York Times Monday that U.S. athletes had planned "for weeks" to demonstrate against oppression.

Why it matters: Protests are banned at the Tokyo Games. Saunders told the NYT a group of American Olympians had settled on the "X" symbol, which she gestured on the podium after winning silver in the shot put Sunday, to represent "unity with oppressed people."