A Trump rally in 2018. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Tulsa City-County Health Department director Bruce Dart told Tulsa World in an interview that he wishes President Trump would postpone his campaign rally on June 20, citing a "significant increase" in coronavirus case trends that could put both the public and Trump himself at risk.

The big picture: Dart's concerns have been echoed by public health experts who say hosting large crowds in an indoor venue without a requirement for face masks could prove to be dangerous. Trump's campaign has informed attendees that the president cannot be held liable if they contract COVID-19.

  • Multiple states are reporting new daily records of coronavirus hospitalizations as much of the country continues to reopen.
  • Tulsa County’s seven-day rolling average has risen from 24.9 cases on June 7 to 51.4 on June 12, according to Tulsa World.

What they're saying: “I think it’s an honor for Tulsa to have a sitting president want to come and visit our community, but not during a pandemic. I’m concerned about our ability to protect anyone who attends a large, indoor event, and I’m also concerned about our ability to ensure the president stays safe as well," Dart said.

  • “COVID is here in Tulsa, it is transmitting very efficiently. I wish we could postpone this to a time when the virus isn’t as large a concern as it is today.”
  • “People are not staying home now, they’re out and about. I completely understand that, staying closed just wasn’t feasible economically and from an emotional, physical perspective. So if we’re going to be out, we shouldn’t be in enclosed spaces and we shouldn’t have extended contact with other people because that’s where the risk lies.”
  • “A large indoor rally with 19-20,000 people is a huge risk factor today in Tulsa, Oklahoma ... I want to make sure we can keep everyone in that building safe, including the president.”

Go deeper: Trump pushes rally date originally set for Juneteenth amid pressure

Go deeper

Sep 17, 2020 - Health

WHO: Health care workers account for around 14% of coronavirus cases

A health worker collecting coronavirus samples in New Delhi on Sept. 16. Photo: Sanchit Khanna/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Though health workers represent less than 3% of the population in many countries, they account for around 14% coronavirus cases reported to the World Health Organization, the organization announced Thursday.

Why it matters: The WHO called on governments and health care leaders to address threats facing the health and safety of these workers, adding that the pandemic has highlighted how protecting them is needed to ensure a functioning health care system.

Updated Sep 18, 2020 - Health

World coronavirus updates

Expand chart
Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

Though health workers represent less than 3% of the population in many countries, they account for around 14% of the coronavirus cases reported to the World Health Organization, WHO announced Thursday.

Why it matters: The WHO called on governments and health care leaders to address threats facing the health and safety of these workers, adding that the pandemic has highlighted how protecting them is needed to ensure a functioning health care system.

Coronavirus cases increase in 17 states

Expand chart
Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Sara Wise/Axios

Coronavirus infections ticked up slightly over the past week, thanks to scattered outbreaks in every region of the country.

Where it stands: The U.S. has been making halting, uneven progress against the virus since August. Overall, we're moving in the right direction, but we're often taking two steps forward and one step back.