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President Trump during the Operation Warp Speed Vaccine Summit on Dec. 8. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted Sunday night that he's stopped an administration directive to give White House staff the COVID-19 vaccine as a priority, but he will get inoculated against the virus "at the appropriate time."

Why it matters: NIAID director Anthony Fauci says 75%–80% of Americans need to get vaccinated against the coronavirus to achieve herd immunity. Vaccine adoption is a matter of trust, and trust in most institutions has hit generational lows.

A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.
  • National Institutes of Health director Francis Collins told NBC's "Meet the Press" Sunday that vaccine skepticism was a "source of great concern for all of us," as he urged people to "disregard all those terrible conspiracy theories."
  • National Security Council spokesperson John Ullyot cited vaccine safety perceptions as a reason in his announcement Sunday that U.S. officials across the country's three branches of government had been given top priority for inoculation.

Of note: President-elect Joe Biden said before the FDA issued an emergency use authorization for Pfizer-BioNTech's coronavirus vaccine he would get inoculated once it was deemed safe.

The big picture: The first batch of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccines left Michigan earlier Sunday.

  • There are a limited number of the vaccines in production, and the CDC recommends priority is given to the highest-risk groups, including health care workers and long-term care facility residents.

By the numbers: Cases and deaths from the virus are continuing to soar across the U.S. Nearly 300,000 Americans have died from COVID-19 and almost 16.3 million have tested positive, per Johns Hopkins.

Go deeper: Middle America is still racking up a ton of new coronavirus cases

Go deeper

Jan 26, 2021 - Health

U.K. surpasses 100,000 COVID-19 deaths

Photo: Owen Humphreys/PA Images via Getty Images

The U.K. on Tuesday surpassed 100,000 coronavirus deaths almost a year after the first two cases were reported in the country, according to government figures.

Why it matters: It is the first European country and fifth country in the world to reach the threshold. The country reported 100,162 deaths on Tuesday.

Scammers have stolen over $130 million in coronavirus-related schemes

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Over 100,000 Americans have collectively reported roughly $132 million in fraud losses from scams related to the coronavirus and government stimulus checks since the March start of the pandemic, according to the Federal Trade Commission.

Why it matters: Coronavirus-related fraud complaints peaked in May when the IRS began sending its first round of stimulus checks. Congress recently proposed a second round of stimulus.