National Guard members deploy near the White House. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump announced in a tweet Sunday that he has ordered the National Guard to begin withdrawing from Washington, D.C.

Why it matters: The presence of federal law enforcement in the nation's capital had been a point of contention between Trump and D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, who described it as an "invasion of our city" on "Fox News Sunday."

  • Bowser formally requested on Thursday that Trump withdraw federal law enforcement and military personnel from the city, citing concerns about "unidentified federal personnel" who were not wearing badges or nametags.

The big picture: Saturday's protests in the nation's capital were likely the largest yet, but they remained mostly peaceful and no arrests were reported.

  • Bowser said Sunday that Trump's decision to send National Guard troops into the district only caused even more people to turn out and protest over the past few days.
  • A huge crowd assembled outside the White House, which has been completely encircled with more than a mile of fencing due to security concerns after Trump was rushed to a bunker May 29.

What he's saying:

"I have just given an order for our National Guard to start the process of withdrawing from Washington, D.C., now that everything is under perfect control. They will be going home, but can quickly return, if needed. Far fewer protesters showed up last night than anticipated!"
— President Trump

Go deeper: George Floyd updates

Go deeper

Trump's failing culture wars

Data: Google; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

President Trump built his political brand by stoking the nation's culture wars, but search data is showing us how much harder it's been for him to replicate that success while running against another white man in his 70s — and while there's a coronavirus pandemic.

The big picture: Google Trends data shows Trump's "Sleepy Joe" name-calling isn't generating nearly the buzz "Crooked Hillary" (or "Little Marco") did in 2016. Base voters who relished doubting President Obama's birth certificate aren't questioning Biden's.

Updated 36 mins ago - Science

Hurricane Isaias makes landfall in North Carolina

People walk through floodwaters on Ocean Blvd. in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, on Monday. Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Hurricane Isaias made landfall as a Category 1 storm near Ocean Isle Beach in southern North Carolina at 11:10 p.m. ET Monday, packing maximum sustained winds of 85 mph, per the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

What's happening: Hurricane conditions were spreading onto the coast of eastern South Carolina and southeastern N.C., the NHC said in an 11 p.m. update. Ocean Isle Beach Mayor Debbie Smith told WECT News the eye of the storm triggered "a series of fires at homes" and "a lot of flooding." Fire authorities confirmed they were responding to "multiple structure fires in the area."

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 18,224,253 — Total deaths: 692,679 — Total recoveries — 10,865,548Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 4,713,500 — Total deaths: 155,401 — Total recoveries: 1,513,446 — Total tests: 57,543,852Map.
  3. Politics: White House will require staff to undergo randomized coronavirus testing — Pelosi says Birx "enabled" Trump on misinformation.
  4. Sports: 13 members of St. Louis Cardinals test positive, prompting MLB to cancel Tigers series — Former FDA chief says MLB outbreaks should be warning sign for schools.
  5. 1 🎥 thing: "Tenet" may be the first major film to get a global pandemic release.