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Members of the U.S. Army park a Bradley Fighting Vehicle in front of the Lincoln Memorial. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Organizers have stepped up security and readied battle tanks, fighter jets and fireworks for President Trump's Fourth of July extravaganza in Washington, D.C., per NPR.

Why it matters: July 4 has been seen as a nonpartisan occasion, but Trump has inserted himself into the event. He tweeted military leaders are "thrilled" he's honoring U.S. forces. Retired generals told Politico he's politicizing the Independence Day celebration. The taxpayer cost hasn't been disclosed, per ABC News. Here's how people have been preparing for the event in Washington, D.C., in photos.

Workers prepare the stage for President Trump's address at the Lincoln Memorial. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images
Workers install a security fence in the Reflecting Pool in front of the Lincoln Memorial. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images
Code Pink activist Medea Benjamin speaks during a news conference at the Lincoln Memorial to protest President Trump's "Salute to America" event Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images
President Trump's supporters rally on Pennsylvania Avenue on the north side of the White House. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
M1A1 Abrams tanks on rail cars in Washington, D.C., ahead of the "Salute to America" event. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images
President Trump is due to address the nation from the Lincoln Memorial at 6:30pm Thursday. Photo: Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call
The Washington Post reports the National Park Service diverted nearly $2.5 million to cover costs for this event, citing 2 people familiar with the matter. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
"Salute to America" organizers say the event is all about honoring the U.S. military. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Peyton Sherwood has 400 "Trump baby" balloons to sell in D.C., and protesters plan to fly a "Trump baby" blimp during the event. Photo: Astrid Riecken For The Washington Post via Getty Images

Go deeper: On the Fourth of July, here are reasons to love the U.S.

This article has been updated with more images.

Editor's note: This article has been updated to remove photos of preparations for the U.S. Capitol concert unaffiliated with the president's event.

Go deeper

Trump to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations before leaving office

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump plans to issue at least 100 pardons and commutations on his final full day in office Tuesday, sources familiar with the matter told Axios.

Why it matters: This is a continuation of the president's controversial December spree that saw full pardons granted to more than two dozen people — including former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort, longtime associate Roger Stone and Charles Kushner, the father of Trump's senior adviser and son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

  • The pardons set to be issued before Trump exits the White House will be a mix of criminal justice ones and pardons for people connected to the president, the sources said.
  • CNN first reported this news.

Go deeper: Convicts turn to D.C. fixers for Trump pardons

Schumer's m(aj)ority checklist

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Capitalizing on the Georgia runoffs, achieving a 50-50 Senate and launching an impeachment trial are weighty to-dos for getting Joe Biden's administration up and running on Day One.

What to watch: A blend of ceremonies, hearings and legal timelines will come into play on Tuesday and Wednesday so Chuck Schumer can actually claim the Senate majority and propel the new president's agenda.

The dark new reality in Congress

National Guard troops keep watch at security fencing. Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

This is how bad things are for elected officials and others working in a post-insurrection Congress:

  • Rep. Norma Torres (D-Calif.) said she had a panic attack while grocery shopping back home.
  • Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) said police may also have to be at his constituent meetings.
  • Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) told a podcaster he brought a gun to his office on Capitol Hill on Jan. 6 because he anticipated trouble with the proceedings that day.