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Photos: Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc; Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The first day of the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump saw a series of procedural clashes over the rules at the heart of the proceeding on Tuesday.

What happened: Senators ultimately approved Senate Majority Leader's Mitch McConnell's proposed roadmap for the trial after a series of votes initiated by Democrats to include more witnesses and evidence failed along party lines.

  • McConnell's roadmap changed significantly early on in Tuesday's debate — allowing each side 24 hours to present their opening arguments over three days, instead of two. That change means that the first days of arguments would max out at eight hours rather than 12.
  • Evidence from the House's impeachment inquiry will be entered into the trial automatically unless there are specific objections from a senator, in another change to McConnell's original plan.
  • The Senate will be able to revisit whether to subpoena witnesses or include more evidence after the forthcoming six days of opening arguments.

The big picture: Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer tried to issue subpoenas for testimony or documents from: (1) The White House; (2) State Department; (3) the Office of Management and Budget; (4) White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney; (5) Defense Department; (6) Robert Blair, Mulvaney's senior advisor, and Michael Duffey, the OMB's associate director for national security programs; and (7) former National Security Advisor John Bolton.

  • Schumer also pushed a subpoena to require that each side release all evidence gathered from an authorized subpoena when admitting new evidence.
  • His other amendments involved giving Chief Justice John Roberts the ability to decide to allow motions on subpoenas and adjusting allotted time for written motions and response.

Inside the room:

  • In the chamber, desks were covered in papers and notepads, including booklets with evidence produced during the impeachment investigation, Axios' Alayna Treene reports from the Capitol.
  • About 9:30 p.m., McConnell, noting the late hour, asked if Schumer could stack the rest of his amendments so they could vote on all of them at once. Schumer said no and added that they could finish voting on Wednesday — but after a brief recess, the two couldn't reach a deal.
  • Many of the senators scribbled handwritten notes throughout, and only water and milk were allowed.
  • To get around the rule of silence, some senators were caught flashing each other notes.
  • Spotted in the audience: Alyssa Milano and former Sen. Jeff Flake.
  • Republican Reps. Mark Meadows, Lee Zeldin and Louie Gohmert came in partway through and sat in the back on the Senate floor.

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Scoop: Gina Haspel almost resigned over plan to install Kash Patel as CIA deputy

Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

CIA Director Gina Haspel almost resigned in early December after President Trump cooked up a hasty plan to install loyalist Kash Patel, a former aide to Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), as her deputy, according to three senior administration officials with direct knowledge of the matter.

Why it matters: The revelations stunned national security officials and almost blew up the leadership of the world's most powerful spy agency.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus deaths reach 4,000 per day as hospitals remain in crisis mode — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden says, "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution — Biden taps ex-FDA chief to lead Operation Warp Speed amid rollout of COVID plan — Widow of GOP congressman-elect who died of COVID-19 will run to fill his seat.
  3. Vaccine: Battling Black mistrust of the vaccines"Pharmacy deserts" could become vaccine deserts — Instacart to give $25 to shoppers who get vaccine.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode againFed chair: No interest rate hike coming any time soon —  Inflation rose more than expected in December.
  5. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.

NRA declares bankruptcy, says it will reincorporate in Texas

Wayne LaPierre of the National Rifle Association (NRA) speaks during CPAC in 2016. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The National Rifle Association said Friday it has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy and will seek to reincorporate in Texas, calling New York, where it is currently registered, a "toxic political environment."

The big picture: The move comes just months after New York Attorney General Letitia James filed a lawsuit to dissolve the NRA, alleging the group committed fraud by diverting roughly $64 million in charitable donations over three years to support reckless spending by its executives.