Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Trump administration is allowing Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients to renew their protections under the program for one year as officials begin a review of DACA and how the administration attempted to end it, a senior administration official announced Tuesday.

Between the lines: Despite the Supreme Court ruling that Trump illegally ended the Obama-era program in June and a federal judge ruling earlier this month that it must be restored to its full status, the administration will continue to reject new applications, according to the official.

  • A more detailed memo is expected later Tuesday.
  • DACA renewals typically extend for two years — not just one.

"These actions will limit the scope of the program while DHS and the administration review its legality, justifications for a possible wind down and other considerations relevant to deciding whether to keep or wind down the DACA policy," the senior administration official said.

  • The official added that the administration expects to face legal challenges.

The big picture: President Trump and key immigration enforcement leaders have lambasted the court's June decision.

  • Trump tweeted the day after that the administration would be "submitting enhanced papers shortly in order to properly fulfill the Supreme Court’s ruling & request of yesterday."
  • But over the past few weeks, as Axios reported, the White House has been eyeing the same decision as inspiration for a series of controversial executive actions —including one that would offer some kind of protections for DACA recipients.

What's next: The review process means that DACA will likely be in place — at least for current recipients — through Election Day, meaning that its ultimate fate could be decided at the ballot box in November.

Read a memo on the new policy.

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President Trump told the New York Post on Thursday that he plans to deliver his Republican National Convention speech from the White House lawn, despite bipartisan criticism of the optics and legality of the location.

Why it matters: Previous presidents avoided blurring staged campaign-style events — like party conventions — with official business of governing on the White House premises, per Politico.