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Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Trump administration is allowing Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients to renew their protections under the program for one year as officials begin a review of DACA and how the administration attempted to end it, a senior administration official announced Tuesday.

Between the lines: Despite the Supreme Court ruling that Trump illegally ended the Obama-era program in June and a federal judge ruling earlier this month that it must be restored to its full status, the administration will continue to reject new applications, according to the official.

  • A more detailed memo is expected later Tuesday.
  • DACA renewals typically extend for two years — not just one.

"These actions will limit the scope of the program while DHS and the administration review its legality, justifications for a possible wind down and other considerations relevant to deciding whether to keep or wind down the DACA policy," the senior administration official said.

  • The official added that the administration expects to face legal challenges.

The big picture: President Trump and key immigration enforcement leaders have lambasted the court's June decision.

  • Trump tweeted the day after that the administration would be "submitting enhanced papers shortly in order to properly fulfill the Supreme Court’s ruling & request of yesterday."
  • But over the past few weeks, as Axios reported, the White House has been eyeing the same decision as inspiration for a series of controversial executive actions —including one that would offer some kind of protections for DACA recipients.

What's next: The review process means that DACA will likely be in place — at least for current recipients — through Election Day, meaning that its ultimate fate could be decided at the ballot box in November.

Read a memo on the new policy.

Go deeper

Amy Harder, author of Generate
Nov 4, 2020 - Energy & Environment

Trump’s exit from Paris climate agreement becomes official

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Call it the long goodbye from the Paris climate agreement.

Driving the news: President Trump’s 2017 announcement withdrawing America from the 2015 accord becomes official at midnight Wednesday after a prolonged process required by the United Nations. It’s a chaotic coincidence that it comes the day after Election Day.

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

15 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.