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Protesters stand outside the Supreme Court on June 15. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

A federal judge ruled on Friday that the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) be restored to its full status, following the Supreme Court's decision that the Trump administration violated federal law when it ended the program.

Why it matters: Friday's decision would force the Trump administration to accept new DACA applications. However, the administration still has legal authority to try to end the program again.

Driving the news: The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in June to uphold protections from deportation for roughly 649,000 unauthorized immigrants in the U.S., by finding that the administration violated federal law in the way it rescinded the program in 2017.

  • "The dispute before the Court is not whether DHS may rescind DACA. All parties agree that it may. The dispute is instead primarily about the procedure the agency followed in doing so," Justice Roberts wrote in the Supreme Court's opinion.

Flashback: Then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions revoked DACA in the fall of 2017, which kicked off a long process of lawsuits and federal court decisions leading to the Supreme Court taking up the case in November 2019, Axios' Stef Kight reports.

Read Friday's decision:

Go deeper: Coalition of businesses urges Trump to keep DACA in place following SCOTUS ruling

Go deeper

Oct 24, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Murkowski says she'll vote to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to Supreme Court

Sen. Lisa Murkowski. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) said Saturday that she'll vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court on Monday, despite her opposition to the process that's recently transpired.

The big picture: Murkowski's decision leaves Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) as the only Republican expected to vote against Barrett.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
3 hours ago - Health

Moderna exec says children could be vaccinated by mid-2021

Tal Zaks, chief medical officer of Moderna, tells "Axios on HBO" that a COVID-19 vaccine could be available for children by the middle of next year.

Be smart: There will be a coronavirus vaccine for adults long before there is one for kids.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Sen. Kelly Loeffler to return to campaign trail after 2nd negative test

Sen. Kelly Loeffler addresses supporters during a rally on Thursday. Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Sen. Kelly Loeffler's (R-Ga.) campaign announced Monday that she "looks forward to getting back out on the campaign trail" after testing negative for COVID-19 for a second time, following earlier conflicting results.

Why it matters: Loeffler has been campaigning at events ahead of a Jan. 5 runoff in elections that'll decide which party holds the Senate majority. Vice President Mike Pence was with her on Friday.