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President Trump said at a White House briefing Thursday that his administration was prepared for the coronavirus outbreak, but the "only thing" it wasn't prepared for was the media's response.

The state of play: Hospitals, state officials and local officials are already warning the federal government about key shortages they might face as the outbreak deepens.

  • Labs will need more of some key ingredients for diagnostic tests, including RNA-extraction kits, reagents and swabs.
  • Ventilators to help patients breathe are also in short supply. The U.S. has about 62,000 and only a limited ability to tap other supplies.

What Trump said: "The only thing we weren't prepared for was the media. The media has not treated it fairly. ... I called for a ban for people coming in from China."

  • "In fact, it was [NBC News], I believe, they called me a racist because I did that. It was many of the people in the room they called me racist and other words because I did that. Because I went so early."
  • "So, when you say that I wasn't prepared, I was the first one to do the ban. Now many other countries are following what I did. But the media doesn't acknowledge that. They know it's true, but they don't want to write about it."

He continued bashing the media after a reporter from far-right One America News asked him if he considered the phrase "Chinese food" racist and alleged without evidence that mainstream media outlets parrot Chinese Communist Party propaganda.

  • "They are siding with China. They are doing things they shouldn't be doing. They are siding with many others. China is the least of it."

The big picture: Trump and other Republican politicians and media personalities have faced backlash in recent days for referring to the coronavirus as the "Chinese virus" or "Wuhan virus."

  • This is in opposition to guidance from the World Health Organization, which requested last month that the epidemic be referred to as coronavirus or COVID-19, rather than terms that could stigmatize individuals with Chinese ancestry.

Go deeper... Coronavirus updates: Surge of American workers file for unemployment

Go deeper

10 mins ago - Health

WHO: AstraZeneca vaccine must be evaluated on "more than a press release"

A medical syringe and vial with fake coronavirus vaccine in front of the World Health Organization (WHO) logo. Photo Illustration: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Top scientists at the World Health Organization on Friday called for more detailed information on a coronavirus vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford.

Why it matters: Oxford and AstraZeneca have said the vaccine was 90% effective in people who got a half dose followed by a full dose, and 62% effective in people who got two full doses. AstraZeneca has since acknowledged that the smaller dose received by some participants was the result of an error by a contractor, per the New York Times.

Court rejects Trump campaign's appeal in Pennsylvania case

Photo: Sarah Silbiger for The Washington Post via Getty Images

A federal appeals court on Friday unanimously rejected the Trump campaign's emergency appeal seeking to file a new lawsuit against Pennsylvania's election results, writing in a blistering ruling that the campaign's "claims have no merit."

Why it matters: It's another devastating blow to President Trump's sinking efforts to overturn the results of the election. Pennsylvania, which President-elect Joe Biden won by more than 80,000 votes, certified its results last week and is expected to award 20 electoral votes to Biden on Dec. 12.

Dave Lawler, author of World
2 hours ago - World

Belarus dictator Lukashenko says he'll leave post after new constitution

Photo: Valery Sharifulin\TASS via Getty

Longtime Belarusian President Aleksandr Lukashenko has said he will step down after a new constitution comes into force, according to Belarusian state media.

Why it matters: Lukashenko has faced three months of protests following a rigged election in August. He has promised to reform the constitution to reduce the near-absolute powers of the president, but has insisted that his strong hand is needed to see that process through.