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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Experts and lawmakers are beginning to call for extraordinary measures to alleviate medical shortages that could cripple the U.S. response to the coronavirus.

Why it matters: These shortages affect both testing and treatment, and if they persist, could also thin the ranks of health care workers able to help treat coronavirus patients. And the only solution may be for the federal government to get involved.

Driving the news: Invoking the Defense Production Act was on a list of options included in a 100-page federal government coronavirus response plan, dated from Friday, reported on by the New York Times last night.

  • The law, passed in 1950, gives the president enormous power to force American manufacturers to produce critical supplies.

What they're saying: Some lawmakers at the federal and local level had already called for the federal government to increase its manufacturing capacity.

  • Mark Levin, chair of the New York City Council's health committee, tweeted yesterday that he's "BEGGING, PLEADING that the fed gov't mobilize production and distribution of medical supplies and equipment."
  • "I urge you to immediately exercise the powers authorized to you by the Defense Production Act (DPA) in order to address impending shortages of critical resources in response to the COVID-19 pandemic," Sen. Bob Mendendez wrote in a letter to President Trump yesterday.

Where it stands: The U.S. is likely to face several key shortages in even a moderate outbreak.

  • Labs will need more of some key ingredients for diagnostic tests, including RNA-extraction kits, reagents and swabs. Staying on top of testing is essential to ultimately controlling the outbreak.
  • States are already sounding the alarm over inadequate supplies of protective gear, such as masks, gloves and gowns, for health care workers.
  • "If we run out of those, we’re hosed. Because then doctors and nurses are going to have a choice between not caring for a sick patient, and putting themselves at risk," said Ashish Jha, the director of Harvard's Global Health Institute.
  • Ventilators to help patients breathe are also in short supply. We have about 62,000, and only a limited ability to tap other supplies.

Doctors in Italy are making difficult decisions every day about how to ration their limited supply of ventilators, the WSJ reports.

The Food and Drug Administration "is in close contact with [personal protective equipment] manufacturers to understand their supply capabilities during this outbreak. We have heard about challenges throughout the supply chain that are presently impacting the availability of PPE products, however, we are taking steps to mitigate shortages that healthcare facilities are already experiencing," the agency said in a statement.

The bottom line: “The worst case scenario in that case is we produce a lot of stuff we don’t end up needing...if we don’t do it, we have a lot of people who die unnecessarily," Jha said.

Go deeper

House passes bill making Juneteenth a federal holiday

Juneteenth march on June 19, 2020 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. Photo by Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images)

The House voted 415-14 on Wednesday to make Juneteenth a federal holiday.

The big picture: All those voting against the measure were Republicans. The vote comes one day after the Senate unanimously approved the bill and three days before the holiday.

3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Group of 20 bipartisan senators back $1.2T infrastructure framework

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) arrives for a meeting with Senate Budget Committee Democrats in the Mansfield Room at the U.S. Capitol building on June 16, 2021 in Washington, DC. The Majority Leader and Democrats on the Senate Budget Committee are meeting to discuss how to move forward with the Biden Administrations budget proposal. Photo: Samuel Corum / Getty Images

A group of 10 Democratic and 10 Republican senators (the "G20") tasked with negotiating an infrastructure deal with the White House has released a statement in support of a $1.2 trillion framework.

Why it matters: Details regarding the plan have not yet been released, but getting 10 Republicans on board means the bill could get the necessary 60 votes to pass.

DOJ drops criminal probe, civil lawsuit against John Bolton over Trump book

Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

The Justice Department has closed its criminal investigation into whether President Trump's former national security adviser John Bolton disclosed classified information with his tell-all memoir, “The Room Where it Happened," according to a source with direct knowledge.

Why it matters: The move comes a year after the Trump administration tried to silence Bolton by suing him in federal court, claiming he breached his contract by failing to complete a pre-publication review for classified information. Prosecutors indicated they had reached a settlement with Bolton to drop the lawsuit in a filing on Wednesday.