Kicking off a series of morning tweets, President Trump accused former FBI Director James Comey of lying to the Senate Judiciary Committee during testimony last May. At that time, Comey stated that he had not authorized an FBI employee to be an anonymous source for a reporter in matters relating to the Trump-Russia investigation or the Clinton email investigation.

The inspiration: Trump saw a Fox & Friends segment this morning, which juxtaposed fired FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe's statement defending his actions at the bureau with Comey's testimony from last year.

The Fox & Friends segment that Trump saw:

Trump's other tweets:

  • Axios' Mike Allen and Jonathan Swan broke the news last night that McCabe handed over memos detailing his interactions with Trump to Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.
  • Trump is referencing a Daily Caller report from last month on the political makeup of Mueller's team. PolitiFact reported last year that a handful of Mueller's then-known team members had indeed donated to Democratic-related causes — though it's worth noting that Mueller himself was at one time a registered Republican.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 30,804,120 — Total deaths: 957,348— Total recoveries: 21,062,785Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 6,766,631 — Total deaths: 199,268 — Total recoveries: 2,577,446 — Total tests: 94,211,463Map.
  3. Education: What we overlooked in the switch to remote learning
  4. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  5. Health: The dwindling chances of eliminating COVID-19.
  6. World: Guatemalan president tests positive for COVID-19 — The countries painting their pandemic recoveries green.

What we overlooked in the switch to remote learning

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

America’s rapid and urgent transition to online school has come with a host of unforeseen consequences that are only getting worse as it continues into the fall.

The big picture: The issues range from data privacy to plagiarism, and schools are ill-equipped to deal with them, experts say.

The positions of key GOP senators on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell talks to reporters on Capitol Hill last Thursday. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With President Trump planning to nominate his third Supreme Court justice nominee by next week, key Republican senators are indicating their stance on replacing the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg just over six weeks out from Election Day.

The big picture: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) has vowed that "Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate." But Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) told Alaska Public Media, "I would not vote to confirm a Supreme Court nominee. We are 50 some days away from an election."