Mar 17, 2018

Source: McCabe gave interview, memos to Mueller

Mueller after briefing members of Congress on Capitol Hill last year. Photo: Saul Loeb / AFP / Getty Images

Andrew McCabe, the former FBI deputy director who was fired Friday night, has met with special counsel Robert Mueller's team and has turned over memos detailing interactions with President Trump, according to a source familiar with the exchange.

  • McCabe's interview with Mueller's prosecutors apparently included what he knows about former FBI director James Comey's firing.

The bottom line: The memos include corroboration by McCabe of Comey's account of his own firing by Trump, according to the source.

  • McCabe alluded to that in a 10-paragraph statement right after his firing, in which he said: "[M]y testimony to the House Intelligence Committee revealed that I would corroborate former Director Comey’s accounts of his discussions with the President."
  • The handful of memos document both McCabe's own direct engagement with the president and Comey's.
  • The memos include an account of at least one in-person meeting with Trump, the source said.

Why it matters: The specifics of Trump's thinking about Comey are of acute interest to Mueller, in part because of Trump's own statements linking the firing to the Russia investigation that is at the heart of the special counsel's mission.

  • Any obstruction of justice argument would center on Trump's firing of Comey. McCabe has signaled that he will be corroborating Comey's account, and with contemporaneous, detailed notes.

Axios sought comment from the special counsel's office.

Go deeper: Statement by McCabe's lawyer, Michael Bromwich, a former inspector general ... Justice Department statement on firing ... McCabe's bio ... Quotes provided about McCabe from prominent national security and FBI/DOJ figures.

Go deeper

Updated 42 mins ago - Politics & Policy

George Floyd protests: What you need to know

Photo: David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Clashes erupted between police and protesters in several major U.S. cities Saturday night as demonstrations over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black men spread across the country.

The big picture: Floyd's death in Minneapolis police custody is the latest reminder of the disparities between black and white communities in the U.S. and comes as African Americans grapple with higher death rates from the coronavirus and higher unemployment from trying to stem its spread.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

U.S. cities crack down on protesters

Demonstrators gather at Lafayette Park across from the White House to protest the death of George Floyd in Washington, D.C. Photo: Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Major U.S. cities have implemented curfews and called on National Guard to mobilize as thousands of demonstrators gather across the nation to continue protesting the death of George Floyd.

The state of play: Hundreds have already been arrested as tensions continue to rise between protesters and local governments. Protesters are setting police cars on fire as freeways remain blocked and windows are shattered, per the Washington Post. Law enforcement officials are using tear gas and rubber bullets to try to disperse crowds and send protesters home.

Trump to invite Russia and other non-member G7 countries to summit

President Trump at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on Saturday. Photo: Saul Martinez/Getty Images

President Trump told reporters on Saturday evening he would postpone the G7 summit to September and expand the meeting to more nations that are not members of the Group of 7.

Details: Trump said he would invite Russia, South Korea, Australia and India to the summit, according to a pool report. "I don’t feel that as a G7 it properly represents what’s going on in the world. It’s a very outdated group of countries," he said.