President Trump visits the southern border fence in Otay Mesa, California, lastSeptember. Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., ruled against the Trump administration's third-country asylum rule late Tuesday.

Why it matters: Per Neal Katayal, a lawyer involved in the legal challenge, the District Court decision "invalidates" the transit ban.

"The decision by Judge Kelly, who President Trump appointed to the bench in 2017, goes into effect immediately."
— Katayal's tweet
  • The decision comes on the heels of the Supreme Court ruling last Thursday that the Trump administration violated federal law when it ended the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

The big picture: The third-country rule prevented immigrants from claiming asylum in the U.S. if they did not apply via a third country they passed through first on their way to the southern border. 

  • Axios has contacted the Trump administration for comment.

Read the decision via DocumentCloud:

Go deeper: Trump administration proposes toughest asylum rules yet

Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

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Trump rails against Obama, FBI, Senate GOP after Supreme Court ruling

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump fired off a series of tweets on Thursday morning after the Supreme Court upheld a subpoena from the Manhattan district attorney for his financial records — attacking the Obama administration, the Mueller investigation, the GOP-led Senate Judiciary Committee and others for allegedly undermining his presidency.

Why it matters: Trump has fought relentlessly to keep his financial records secret. The two Supreme Court justices that he appointed — Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh — sided against Trump, with Kavanaugh writing in a concurring opinion: "In our system of government, as this Court has often stated, no one is above the law. That principle applies, of course, to a President."

Dec 7, 2019 - Health

The return of the ACA wars

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Affordable Care Act is no longer the center of the national political debate, for the first time in nearly a decade. But it could quickly come roaring back to the fore.

What we're watching: A federal appeals court is set to rule any day now on whether the ACA's individual mandate is unconstitutional (yes, that again) — and, if so, how much of the rest of the law would have to fall along with it.

Robert Mueller speaks out on Roger Stone commutation

Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller testifies before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on Capitol Hill on Wednesday July 24, 2019. Photo: The Washington Post / Contributor

Former special counsel Robert Mueller responded to claims from President Trump and his allies that Roger Stone was a "victim" in the Justice Department's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, writing in a Washington Post op-ed published Saturday: "He remains a convicted felon, and rightly so."

Why it matters: The rare public comments by Mueller come on the heels of President Trump's move to commute the sentence of his longtime associate, who was sentenced in February to 40 months in prison for crimes stemming from the Russia investigation. The controversial decision brought an abrupt end to the possibility of Stone spending time behind bars.