Online privacy

Europe's new privacy law tests muscle on Google

The Google G logo being attacked by the stars in the European Union flag
Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

The roughly $57 million fine French regulators leveled on Google Monday is the first real test of how aggressively Europe's sweeping privacy rules will force change at U.S.-based tech giants.

Why it matters: The European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has sparked an urgent effort to pass a national online privacy law in Washington. And state lawmakers are attempting to create their own regulations, too.

France fines Google $57 million for privacy rules violation

Google with the subtitle in French 'Google Assistant in different formats'
Google with the subtitle in French 'Google Assistant in different formats'. Photo: Denis Charlet/AFP/Getty Images

A data-privacy agency for France said Google was in violation of the EU's General Data Protection Regulation and will be fined nearly $57 million, the Washington Post reports.

Details: The agency said Google failed to fully disclose to users how their data is collected and what happens to it. In addition, the agency said Google made it too difficult for users to understand and manage preferences on how their personal information is used, especially in regards to personalized ads. Both are in violation of GDPR.

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