Mental health

Facebook tightens rules around self-harm images

Shannon Geames from Tennessee, wears suicide prevention wristbands while lobbying Congress.
Shannon Geames from Tennessee, wears suicide prevention wristbands while lobbying Congress. Photo: Evelyn Hockstein/for The Washington Post via Getty Images

Coinciding with World Suicide Prevention Day, Facebook is announcing a series of policy changes designed to keep users from encouraging self-harm, while also trying to preserve the ability for people to discuss their struggles without shame.

Why it matters: Globally, someone dies every 40 seconds by suicide and experts say up to 25 times as many will attempt suicide.

White House considers new mental illness project to target violent behavior

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

The White House is eyeing a proposal that would try to identify early warning signs of violent behavior in people with mental illness, the Washington Post reports. Supporters see it as a way for President Trump to address mass shootings without making changes to gun laws.

Why it matters: As we've written time and again, most mentally ill people are not violent, and the majority of mass shooters have not been diagnosed with a mental illness. And while the stated intention of the proposal is a good one, there are reasons to question whether it'll work.