2020 elections

2020 Democrats to qualify for debates based on grassroots fundraising

CNN anchor Anderson Cooper prepares to moderate a CNN-sponsored Democratic presidential debate in Las Vegas, Nevada in 2015.
CNN anchor Anderson Cooper prepares to moderate a CNN-sponsored Democratic presidential debate in Las Vegas, Nevada in 2015. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The Democratic National Committee announced Thursday that no more than 20 candidates will participate in the first two primary debates over two consecutive nights this summer, and that the format will require candidates to meet grassroots fundraising or polling thresholds.

Details: To qualify, candidates need to register at least 1% of support in at least three state or national polls approved by the party, or have received donations from at least 65,000 people, including a minimum of 200 people in 20 states. NBC News, MSNBC and Telemundo are sponsoring the first debate in June, followed by CNN-sponsored debates in July. The events will be broadcast weeknights on prime time with no more than 10 candidates onstage at a time.

Democrats want Amy McGrath to take on McConnell

Amy McGrath smiles before campaign crowd.
Photo: Jason Davis/Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer has been trying to encourage Amy McGrath, the first female U.S. Marine to fly in an F-18 during combat, to challenge Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in Kentucky next year, Politico reports.

Yes, but: McGrath failed to win her House bid last year, and Kentucky Republicans believe they have a playbook for how to defeat her again in 2020. Politico reports that McConnell's team is already conducting opposition research against McGrath while senior Republicans are set to meet in Washington about a potential campaign against her.

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